Work results in a change in energy?

In summary, there is confusion about the concept of work and its relationship to an object's change in kinetic energy and total mechanical energy. While some resources state that work is equal to the object's change in kinetic energy, others believe it is the change in total mechanical energy. Additionally, there is a question about whether the work done on an object being raised vertically upward is equal to its gravitational potential energy. Further explanation and clarification is needed to fully understand this concept.
  • #1
Dee08
1
0
In my textbook and in a lot of other resources it says that the work done on an object is equal to the object's change in kinetic energy. I was under the impression that work is the change in total mechanical energy.
Also, if an object is being raised vertically upward, isn't the work done on the object equal to its gravitational potential energy?

I'm really confused! It would be greatly appreciated if someone could explain this concept to me :)
 
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  • #2
I think it is correct to say that the work is equal to the object's change in kinetic energy, if by work you mean the one of the net force on the object (which includes gravity).
 

Related to Work results in a change in energy?

1. How does work result in a change in energy?

Work is defined as the application of force over a distance. When work is done on an object or system, energy is transferred and can result in a change in the object's or system's energy state. This can manifest as a change in the object's position, speed, or internal energy.

2. What is the relationship between work and energy?

Work and energy are closely related concepts. Work is the transfer of energy from one object or system to another, while energy is the ability to do work. In other words, work results in a change in energy, and energy is required to perform work.

3. Why is work considered a form of energy?

Work and energy are considered to be interchangeable forms of energy. This is because work can be converted into other forms of energy, such as kinetic or potential energy, and vice versa. This is demonstrated by the law of conservation of energy, which states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or transformed.

4. How does the direction of work affect the change in energy?

The direction of work is important in determining the change in energy. When work is done in the same direction as the force applied, the energy of the system increases. On the other hand, when work is done in the opposite direction of the applied force, the energy of the system decreases.

5. What are some real-life examples of work resulting in a change in energy?

There are many examples of work resulting in a change in energy in our daily lives. For instance, when a person lifts a box off the ground, their muscles do work on the box, transferring energy to it and causing it to gain potential energy. Similarly, a moving car does work on its surroundings, resulting in a change in kinetic energy. Other examples include a light bulb converting electrical energy into light energy and a battery powering a device by converting chemical energy into electrical energy.

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