Would the universe rotate plane polarized light?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of chemical reactions and their potential outcomes. It is stated that reactions between two achiral molecules will always result in a symmetrical product or a racemic mixture, while reactions involving chiral molecules can produce any possible product. The idea of symmetry and asymmetry is also mentioned, with the conclusion that the universe may be composed mostly of achiral molecules and racemic mixtures due to billions of years of chemical reactions. However, it is argued that this does not necessarily indicate the composition of the entire universe, as life on Earth primarily utilizes levo-rotatory amino acids.
  • #1
Spirochete
127
0
I posted this in cosmology too, but I felt it deserved to be here also.

I recently learned something about chemical reactions: A reaction between two achiral molecules will always yield either a symmetrical product or a racemic mixture/s. A reaction involving chiral molecules may yield any possible product. Thus symmetry is always preserved, but asymmetry may yield symmetry.

Given billions of years of chemical reactions, regardless of what molecules we started with it would seem that we are proceding toward symmetry. Does this mean that the universe must be composed entirely, or virtually entirely, of some combination of achiral molecules and racemic mixtures?
 
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  • #2
I don't think that follows. Life on Earth, for example, uses only levo-rotatory amino acids (with a few exceptions).
 
  • #3


I cannot definitively answer whether the universe is composed of achiral molecules and racemic mixtures or not. However, I can provide some insights and interpretations based on current scientific understanding.

Firstly, the concept of chirality and symmetry in chemical reactions is well-established in organic chemistry. However, it is important to note that this concept applies to chemical reactions within a closed system, such as a laboratory experiment. The universe, on the other hand, is an open and constantly evolving system, with countless variables and interactions at play. Therefore, it is not appropriate to directly apply the principles of chemical reactions to the entire universe.

Additionally, while it is true that symmetry is often preserved in chemical reactions, this does not necessarily mean that the universe must be composed of symmetrical or achiral molecules. In fact, there is evidence that asymmetry and chiral molecules do exist in the universe, such as in the structure of some galaxies and the formation of amino acids in space.

Furthermore, the idea that the universe is progressing towards symmetry is a philosophical interpretation and not a scientific fact. The laws of physics and chemistry do not dictate any particular direction or goal for the universe. The evolution of the universe is driven by a complex interplay of various physical and chemical processes, and it is impossible to predict with certainty what the ultimate outcome will be.

In conclusion, while the concept of symmetry and chirality is important in understanding chemical reactions, it is not applicable to the entire universe. The universe is a vast and dynamic system, and its composition and evolution cannot be reduced to simple principles of chemical reactions.
 

Related to Would the universe rotate plane polarized light?

1. How does the rotation of the universe affect plane polarized light?

The rotation of the universe does not directly affect plane polarized light. This type of light is characterized by its oscillation in a single plane, and its behavior is not influenced by the rotation of the universe.

2. Can the universe rotate plane polarized light?

No, the universe cannot rotate plane polarized light. The rotation of the universe refers to the overall movement and spin of celestial bodies, while plane polarized light is a property of electromagnetic waves.

3. Is the rotation of the universe responsible for the polarization of light?

No, the rotation of the universe is not responsible for the polarization of light. Light becomes polarized when it interacts with certain materials or is emitted from specific sources, but its polarization is not affected by the rotation of the universe.

4. Can the rotation of the universe cause changes in the polarization of light?

No, the rotation of the universe does not cause changes in the polarization of light. As mentioned, the rotation of the universe and the polarization of light are two different phenomena and do not directly affect each other.

5. Are there any theories linking the rotation of the universe to plane polarized light?

There are currently no scientific theories linking the rotation of the universe to plane polarized light. However, there are ongoing studies and research on the polarization of light and how it is affected by various factors in the universe.

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