Need high-temp "rubber" coating


by refind
Tags: coating, hightemp, rubber
refind
refind is offline
#1
Oct30-12, 11:16 AM
P: 28
Hey I'm looking to coat some 0.5" aluminum rods with some sort of coating to increase the friction coefficient ("tackiness" I believe it's called). It will be used in high temperature environments of up to 200C. Does anyone know of such product?

I tried calling this company but that product can't get anywhere near 200C.
http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip

Thanks!
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MATLABdude
MATLABdude is offline
#2
Nov3-12, 06:10 AM
Sci Advisor
P: 1,724
A high-temperature silicone?
Enthalpy
Enthalpy is offline
#3
Nov6-12, 05:33 PM
P: 660
It's just that silicone won't adhere to aluminium. Maybe things get less bad if you anodise first.

My suggestion is a nickel layer. These have a high coefficient of friction, and better, they don't gall.

You already know that aluminium alloys are capable of nearly nothing at 200, do you?

darkside00
darkside00 is offline
#4
Nov7-12, 03:09 PM
P: 83

Need high-temp "rubber" coating


could try a belzona coating depending on what your doing

http://www.belzona.com/products.aspx

They are usually painted on smooth, but I can imagine you cant make it rougher when you apply it. Also expensive but good for temps up to 180C


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