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Fusion with help of accelerators?

by Stanley514
Tags: accelerators, fusion
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Drakkith
#55
Feb16-13, 11:09 AM
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Quote Quote by Stanley514 View Post
In the best scenario the ultrashort laser pulse would not just heat plasma coloumn,it suppose to cause thermonuclear explosion of the coloumn instantly.If dense focus exist couple of nanosecond it is quite sufficient time for picosecond pulse to explode it.
Picosecond is much smaller piece of time than nanosecond.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inertia...#Fast_ignition
Interesting. I hadn't read about this development before.
ZapperZ
#56
Feb17-13, 06:14 AM
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In case people missed it, NIF did not achieve ignition last year and missed their stated milestone.

So, are we still trying to achieve fusion with accelerators here? I still find it amusing that people think we can get a net energy out of such a thing. The whole issue with fusion is not just creating the process, but generating energy out of the whole process, i.e. it generates more energy that it uses.

So for people who are proposing this concept of using accelerators, have you ever looked at the wall-plug efficiency of a typical particle accelerator? And what kind of luminosity do you need to actually get more energy than you are consuming? After all, this IS in the "engineering" forum, isn't it? Such issue must be considered and is part of an engineering design concept.

Zz.
Joseph Chikva
#57
Feb21-13, 01:25 PM
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Typical particle accelerator's efficiency is rather high - has 90% order.
Unlike lasers having 1-2 orders lower efficiency.

luminosity?
Ion diods, ion diods with inductive voltage adders give very high currents - tens thousands and even millions amperes in short pulses.
As well as induction linacs.

You can direct two ion beams at the same direction but with different velocities and along the same axis but oppositely you can direct relativistic electron beam with 3 orders of magnitude lower current. As result in some conditions you will get the combined self-focusing beam (high density), in which fast ions will collide slowly moving ions.
Fusion in beams is possible!
Velikovsky
#58
Mar1-13, 07:19 PM
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The general train of thought seems to be "smashing" atoms together to achieve fusion, This is certainly possible but the greatest challenge would be the containment of said fusion. I wonder is it possible to make "compressive clusters" of atoms to achieve fusion around a high gravity core? Such a fusion reactor would be self containing around the core that would in fact act as a "cluster resistor" with the atoms "squeezing" themselves together at the point of highest resistance. Any thoughts or ideas on this? Is it a possibility?
Joseph Chikva
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Mar1-13, 11:37 PM
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Quote Quote by Velikovsky View Post
The general train of thought seems to be "smashing" atoms together to achieve fusion, This is certainly possible but the greatest challenge would be the containment of said fusion. I wonder is it possible to make "compressive clusters" of atoms to achieve fusion around a high gravity core? Such a fusion reactor would be self containing around the core that would in fact act as a "cluster resistor" with the atoms "squeezing" themselves together at the point of highest resistance. Any thoughts or ideas on this? Is it a possibility?
Yes, gravitational confinement is in existence in the stars. But in earth conditions that is impossible because for starting fusion impracticable large gas quantities of gas have to be combined together.
Stanley514
#60
Mar2-13, 04:26 PM
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You can direct two ion beams at the same direction but with different velocities and along the same axis but oppositely you can direct relativistic electron beam with 3 orders of magnitude lower current. As result in some conditions you will get the combined self-focusing beam (high density), in which fast ions will collide slowly moving ions.
Fusion in beams is possible!
If this is for real why is not used to generate power?Could you give some ref. on such experiments?
Velikovsky
#61
Mar2-13, 06:13 PM
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Quote Quote by Stanley514 View Post
If this is for real why is not used to generate power?Could you give some ref. on such experiments?
Hi Stanley, I found this link on Ion Beam Fusion at Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California. Very promising work by the look of things!
http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/...ne/01-HIF.html
Drakkith
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Mar2-13, 07:14 PM
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Quote Quote by Stanley514 View Post
If this is for real why is not used to generate power?Could you give some ref. on such experiments?
Because it doesn't generate net power. It uses more than it produces.
Astronuc
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Mar2-13, 08:07 PM
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More recent NDCX-II activities

http://hifweb.lbl.gov/public/slides/...n2011+Warp.pdf

http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-relea...x-accelerator/

Plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers
http://nonneutral.pppl.gov/pdfpapers...rces_Paper.pdf
E. P. Gilsona, R. C. Davidsona, P. C. Efthimiona, I. D. Kaganovicha, J. W. Kwanb, S. M. Lidiab, P. A. Nib, P. K. Royb, P. A. Seidlb, W. L. Waldronb, J. J. Barnardc, A. Friedmanc
aPrinceton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey, 08543, USA
bLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, 94720, USA
cLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O Box 808, Livermore, California, 94550, USA


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