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Phosphorous ion in solution and subsequent electromigration?

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dustyd
#1
Jan29-14, 02:01 PM
P: 1
Hi there,

I would like to know if it possible at all to have phosphorous ions in solution ie P^3- so that I can electromigrate them towards a surface. As I currently understand, this ion is under the phosphide compounds group, and is the least electronegative. For any P electromigration towards the surface to take place I currently understand that it has to be in as elemental as possible ie P^3.

My aim is to attract phosphorous atoms towards a surface and to then diffuse them into the material providing the surface using other means.

I am not very experienced with chemistry and am not quite sure how engineer this.

Thankyou,
Louis
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Borek
#2
Jan29-14, 03:11 PM
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Quote Quote by dustyd View Post
I would like to know if it possible at all to have phosphorous ions in solution ie P^3-
Nope.


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