Register to reply

Would the sky be red if the atmosphere was thicker?

by willstaruss22
Tags: atmosphere
Share this thread:
willstaruss22
#1
Dec19-13, 01:21 AM
P: 96
Lets say Earths atmosphere with the same composition of gases was 500 bar. Would the sky be red instead of blue because light from the Sun would have to travel through more atmosphere?
Phys.Org News Partner Astronomy news on Phys.org
Mysterious molecules in space
Next-generation Thirty Meter Telescope begins construction in Hawaii
Comet Jacques makes a 'questionable' appearance
willem2
#2
Dec19-13, 01:44 AM
P: 1,395
The sun itself would be very red. I dont't think the sky would have to be red, as the light that you see would still be the part of the sunlight that is scattered. At sunrise/sunset, the sunlight will take a much longer path through the atmosphere, and only the sun itself and the sky close to it is red.
adjacent
#3
Dec19-13, 01:52 AM
PF Gold
adjacent's Avatar
P: 1,465
Quote Quote by willem2 View Post
The sun itself would be very red. I dont't think the sky would have to be red, as the light that you see would still be the part of the sunlight that is scattered. At sunrise/sunset, the sunlight will take a much longer path through the atmosphere, and only the sun itself and the sky close to it is red.
If the atmosphere was thicker,wouldn't the sun look red even at noon?

willem2
#4
Dec19-13, 02:03 AM
P: 1,395
Would the sky be red if the atmosphere was thicker?

Quote Quote by adjacent View Post
If the atmosphere was thicker,wouldn't the sun look red even at noon?
Yes. What I meant was, that sunset/sunrise with a normal earth atmosphere mimics the situation with a much thicker atmosphere.
willstaruss22
#5
Dec19-13, 03:59 PM
P: 96
So at noon the sky would essentially still be blue but the Sun would look red?
sophiecentaur
#6
Dec22-13, 11:33 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
sophiecentaur's Avatar
P: 11,939
Quote Quote by willstaruss22 View Post
So at noon the sky would essentially still be blue but the Sun would look red?
With a thicker atmosphere, not only blues would be scattered away from the direct path from the Sun. I imagine that you would also see green parts of the spectrum being scattered in the sky, away from the Sun. This could give a more Cyan tint to the sky. This is the sort of colour you can see in the western sky near sunset, where the atmospheric path is long and the normal blue of the sky becomes 'tainted' with a greenish hue and makes that very attractive, temporary greeny blue which we all recognise as a precursor to darkness.
With a really thick atmosphere (we have to mean 'dense' here, too) the outline of the Sun would also become blurred by scattering (as we get when viewing the Sun through thin cloud at sunset).


Register to reply

Related Discussions
If Earths atmosphere were thicker? Earth 3
Thicker pipe, more pressure? General Physics 4
What can I use to make clear dish soap thicker? Chemistry 5
Glass thicker at bottom myth General Discussion 10
FTL in an atmosphere... General Physics 0