sinx and cosx functions


by Ry122
Tags: cosx, functions, sinx
Ry122
Ry122 is offline
#1
Apr2-07, 05:12 PM
P: 516
What differences is there between a sinx and cosx function?
Do they both use this equation?
y=Asin(BX+C)+D
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Internet co-creator Cerf debunks 'myth' that US runs it
Astronomical forensics uncover planetary disks in Hubble archive
Solar-powered two-seat Sunseeker airplane has progress report
cristo
cristo is offline
#2
Apr2-07, 05:14 PM
Mentor
cristo's Avatar
P: 8,287
Well no, because thats the sine function, and not the cosine function! This may help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometric_function
Ry122
Ry122 is offline
#3
Apr2-07, 06:11 PM
P: 516
That's too in depth for me.
I just wanted to know the difference between
y=sinx and y=cosx when graphed.

cristo
cristo is offline
#4
Apr2-07, 06:12 PM
Mentor
cristo's Avatar
P: 8,287

sinx and cosx functions


Ok, try this: http://faculty.ed.umuc.edu/~swalsh/M...Sin%20Cos.html
Gib Z
Gib Z is offline
#5
Apr3-07, 02:16 AM
HW Helper
Gib Z's Avatar
P: 3,353
Maybe cristo just missed it, but Ry122 is actually right, cosine can also be expressed in that form of asin(bx+c) + d.

This happens because sin (90degrees-x)= cos x.

So in answer to your original question, the difference when graphed between sin x and cos x is that the cos graph is the same as sins, moved back 90 degrees to the left.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
sinx and cosx diverge? Calculus & Beyond Homework 6
Integration of (cosx/ (2-cosx)) Calculus & Beyond Homework 2
sinusoidal graphs (y=sinx and y=cosx equations) General Math 1
Differentiate y=x sinx cosx Differential Equations 6
integrate cosx^3dx Calculus 7