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First & Second derivative of a function

by Agent M27
Tags: derivative, function
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Agent M27
#1
Feb7-10, 02:57 PM
P: 171
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
The function Sh(t) = 30[cos(16.04*)]t models the horizantal position of a pellet with respect to time.

Find the first & second derivatives of Sh(t).



2. Relevant equations


3. The attempt at a solution I attached a word document because I lack the ability to put together a correctly formatted latex doc in my post. I apologize for the inconvenience. Thank you in advance.

Joe


1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution
Attached Files
File Type: doc Derivative question.doc (58.5 KB, 3 views)
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Dustinsfl
#2
Feb7-10, 03:01 PM
P: 629
Sh(t) = 30[cos(16.04*)]t
1st derivative 30cos(16.04)
2nd 0
If the t is in the cos function, then
1st 16.04*30*(-sin16.04t)
2nd 16.04^2*30*(-cos16.04t)
vela
#3
Feb7-10, 03:56 PM
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The first term in the numerator of your limit should be [itex]30(\cos 16.04^\circ)(t+\Delta t)[/itex], so [itex]\Delta t[/itex] gets multiplied by the constant.

Dustinsfl
#4
Feb7-10, 04:00 PM
P: 629
First & Second derivative of a function

I didn't download the paper. I just responded to what the derivatices would be based on what is giving. You need to do the limit definition to obtain the derivatives?
Agent M27
#5
Feb8-10, 06:24 AM
P: 171
So for my first derivative I get to an answer of delta t/delta t, which I'm sure isn't correct. Are there some rules for differentiating when trig functions are involved that differs from a function say f(x)=x^3 ? Also I posted this question incorrectly as I was going off memory the first time. In the real problem there is no limit written next to the function, does this change things at all? I figured that equation without a limit is just the slope of a secant line. Thanks in advance.

Joe
Agent M27
#6
Feb8-10, 08:31 AM
P: 171
I figured it out. I was missing some rules for derivatives such as f(x)= a constant * a variable, then f'(x) =the constant. Another one was f'(x) of a constant =0. This is of course what Dustin was trying to tell me, I just couldn't put it together from that context. Thanks for your help gentlemen.

Joe


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