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Linear Equations (General and Standard forms: From Wikipedia)

by jaja1990
Tags: equations, forms, linear, standard, wikipedia
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jaja1990
#1
Feb11-12, 07:52 AM
P: 26
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_equation

General form:-



It says (under the title General Form) "If B is nonzero, then the y-intercept, that is the y-coordinate of the point where the graph crosses the y-axis (where x is zero), is −C/B, and the slope of the line is −A/B."

How is the slope deduced to be -A/B?


Standard form:-



Aren't this form contradictory to the first form?
I mean, both are the same, but here C is positive, and on the left side of the equation, while in the General Form, C is positive, and on the right side of the equation.
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Feb11-12, 09:55 AM
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Quote Quote by jaja1990 View Post
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_equation

General form:-



It says (under the title General Form) "If B is nonzero, then the y-intercept, that is the y-coordinate of the point where the graph crosses the y-axis (where x is zero), is −C/B, and the slope of the line is −A/B."

How is the slope deduced to be -A/B?


Standard form:-



Aren't this form contradictory to the first form?
I mean, both are the same, but here C is positive, and on the left side of the equation, while in the General Form, C is positive, and on the right side of the equation.
The slope of a line is the amount that y changes if x increases by 1.
If x increases by 1, Ax increases by A, so By has to decrease by A.
More specifically if y changes by -A/B, then By changes by -A.

The second form is a new equation in which the old A, B and C no longer apply.
It is more or less related to the first form, but as you already surmised the C in the second form would have to be minus the C of the first form, if A and B are the same.
jaja1990
#3
Feb11-12, 11:32 AM
P: 26
But I thought the change doesn't have to be 1 in x? What if the change is p?

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Feb11-12, 11:33 AM
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Linear Equations (General and Standard forms: From Wikipedia)

Quote Quote by jaja1990 View Post
But I thought the change doesn't have to be 1 in x? What if the change is p?
The slope of a line is defined to be the change in y if x changes by 1.

If x changes by p, then y will change by p times the slope.
jaja1990
#5
Feb11-12, 11:42 AM
P: 26
From Wikipedia: "The slope of a line in the plane containing the x and y axes is generally represented by the letter m, and is defined as the change in the y coordinate divided by the corresponding change in the x coordinate, between two distinct points on the line. "

That's what I meant.

"The slope of a line is the amount that y changes if x increases by 1.
If x increases by 1, Ax increases by A, so By has to decrease by A."

So, if x increases by p, Ax increase by Ap, so By has to decrease by Ap. (So, y = Ap/B).

This means -Ap/B should be the slope in general for the equation Ax + By + C = 0. Or is my conclusion wrong?
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Feb11-12, 11:44 AM
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As you say, the slope is the change in the y coordinate divided by the corresponding change in the x coordinate.

Since -Ap/B is the change in y if x changes by p, that means that the slope is -Ap/B divided by p, which is -A/B.
jaja1990
#7
Feb11-12, 11:47 AM
P: 26
That's right.

Thank you :)
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Feb11-12, 11:49 AM
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You're welcome.


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