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Wave function in SHM

by Saxby
Tags: function, simple, wave
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Saxby
#1
Feb18-13, 12:24 PM
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P: 45
What is the wave function of a simple harmonic wave?

y(x,t)=Asin(ωt+kx)
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sleepycoffee
#2
Feb18-13, 01:25 PM
P: 6
y(x,t)=Asin(ωt+kx) is the equation of motion for a simple harmonic oscillator.

You get this by solving Newton's force law..

[itex] F=ma=-kx \\
ma+kx=0 \\
a+\frac{k}{m}x=0 [/itex]
Or you can write

[itex] \ddot{x}+\frac{k}{m}x=0 [/itex]

This is a differential equation, solved by Asin(ωt+kx), where [itex] \omega = \sqrt{\frac{k}{m}} [/itex].

I'm not sure if this answers your question?
Jorriss
#3
Feb18-13, 05:28 PM
P: 1,042
Quote Quote by sleepycoffee View Post
y(x,t)=Asin(ωt+kx) is the equation of motion for a simple harmonic oscillator.

You get this by solving Newton's force law..

[itex] F=ma=-kx \\
ma+kx=0 \\
a+\frac{k}{m}x=0 [/itex]
Or you can write

[itex] \ddot{x}+\frac{k}{m}x=0 [/itex]

This is a differential equation, solved by Asin(ωt+kx), where [itex] \omega = \sqrt{\frac{k}{m}} [/itex].

I'm not sure if this answers your question?
He was asking for the wave function. You need to solve it with the Schrodinger equation, not Newtons laws.

sleepycoffee
#4
Feb19-13, 01:45 AM
P: 6
Wave function in SHM

This is posted in classical physics, however.. and in any case if it is undergoing simple harmonic motion then it isn't a quantum harmonic oscillator, so I don't see any reason to be messing around with Schrodingers.
Jorriss
#5
Feb19-13, 08:07 AM
P: 1,042
Quote Quote by sleepycoffee View Post
This is posted in classical physics, however.. and in any case if it is undergoing simple harmonic motion then it isn't a quantum harmonic oscillator, so I don't see any reason to be messing around with Schrodingers.
Fair enough, it is a bit ambiguous eh?


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