Recent content by AngeloG

  1. A

    Linear Dependence

    Err, it was part of: 1, cos(pi x), sin(pi x). Those are the functions. 1 is linear independent, cos(pi x) and sin(pi x) I'm not sure about.
  2. A

    Linear Dependence

    The question is: Check the linear dependency of the functions sin(pi x).
  3. A

    Linear Dependence

    Check for Linear Dependence for: \sin \pi x [-1, 1] I'm thinking it's Linear Dependent. Since it says that any linear combination must be 0. a*x + b*y = 0, a = b = 0. So for any integer x, the value is 0. So [-1, 1] works.
  4. A

    At a crossroad; Civil or Mechanical Engineering

    Well, I'm going to a big University this upcoming fall. I'm at a crossroads on what and where I want to go in terms of Engineering. I'm planning to shoot for my masters. Civil vs Mechanical. I'm a bit sad that Civil Engineers get paid crap and it takes so long to get paid well (not sure?)...
  5. A

    Slightly Confused About Tension

    The best thing to do is draw a force body diagram (as said above by Archduke). It makes it a lot easier. The forces you see in the X or Y need to all equal out to M*A. Since Fx or Fy = M*A, also the sum of forces must equal m*a. So in the picture, you have the force of gravity pulling down and...
  6. A

    Work example wrong in my text? (it's driving me bonkers!)

    Calling the X and Y on the diagonals; there is no acceleration in the Y. http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/6626/problemzl2.th.jpg [Broken]
  7. A

    Work example wrong in my text? (it's driving me bonkers!)

    \ is the Y, / is the x. There is no acceleration in the Y, as this object is fixed on the ramp. If it had acceleration in the Y, it would be moving up or down. However, it is not. Through similar triangles, the {Fy = N = mgcos(theta).
  8. A

    Work example wrong in my text? (it's driving me bonkers!)

    Through similar triangles. {Fx = mgsin(theta) = ma {Fy = N - Wcos(theta) = 0 (no accel in the y); N= Wcos(theta). The theta is 10 degrees.
  9. A

    Work example wrong in my text? (it's driving me bonkers!)

    Horizontal distance from top to bottom; refers to the distance that the object travels on the incline. Rather than the bottom of the triangle. The actual distance it travels is 40m, however, we want the height. So we just do the cos(theta) of it, cos(theta) = adjacent/hypotenuse. adjacent =...
  10. A

    Work example wrong in my text? (it's driving me bonkers!)

    No, you use the inclination of the hill =p. The work book is correct. d*cos(theta) = height. mgh -> (45)(-9.8)*[0-40cos(10)] = 1.7x10^4 J (two sig figs)
  11. A

    Two Resistance Problems (Circuits)

    Doh! Haha, that could be the problem =p. It helps to read carefully :s.
  12. A

    Two Resistance Problems (Circuits)

    Homework Statement 15. (II) A close inspection of an electrical circuit reveals that a 480-Ω resistor was inadvertently soldered in the place where a 320-Ω resistor is needed. How can this be fixed without removing anything from the existing circuit? 16. (II) Two resistors when connected in...
  13. A

    Forces and Speed

    We were talking about, let's say we were to do things in incredible slow motion. We had two magnets doing something (attracting/repelling), the magnetic force is there. We were to destroy a magnetic instantaneously. Does that force act instantaneously or does it take time? I haven't gone...
  14. A

    Forces and Speed

    Okay, so forces don't have speed but a force acting on a body have speed? Still kind of confused. Basically, does the force of gravity have speed or does gravity have speed?
  15. A

    Forces and Speed

    Just speed as a magnitude; forces don't have speed correct? I was trying to explain something to a friend, and it was very hard for me to express or explain in English. He had to drop Physics after classical mechanics. So it's very difficult arguing with him. We got on the subject of gravity...
Top