Recent content by Kaleem

  1. K

    Describing a region using spherical coordinates

    You get z=√(x2+y2) ≤ ρ ≤1
  2. K

    Describing a region using spherical coordinates

    You're right, I made a mistake when i factored it out, if i simplify I get 1 = tanφ, which gives me φ= π/4. Which confuses me, would the lower bound for ρ be π/4 or would that just be the upper bound for φ?
  3. K

    Describing a region using spherical coordinates

    Homework Statement Describe using spherical coordinates the solid E in the first octant that lies above the half-cone z=√(x2+y2) but inside x2+y2+z2=1. Your final answer must be written in set-builder notation. Homework Equations ρ = x2+y2+z2 x = ρsinφcosθ y = ρsinφsinθ z = ρcosφ The Attempt...
  4. K

    Gauss's Law Problem: long, cylindrical charge distribution

    I see exactly what you mean now, thank you!
  5. K

    Gauss's Law Problem: long, cylindrical charge distribution

    What I got from this method so far is ρr2/2Rε0
  6. K

    Gauss's Law Problem: long, cylindrical charge distribution

    Homework Statement Consider a long, cylindrical charge distribution of radius R with uniform charge density ρ. a) Using Gauss’s law, find the electric field at distance r from the axis, where r < R b) Using Gauss’s law, find the electric field at distance r from the axis, where r > R...
  7. K

    Gaussian surface (infinitely long cylindrical conductor)

    Here is the original picture and question, I found the original diagram a little more confusing.
  8. K

    Gaussian surface (infinitely long cylindrical conductor)

    This is what I have so far, in regards to an actual drawing of it, I believe we would take our radius as a
  9. K

    Gaussian surface (infinitely long cylindrical conductor)

    Really? I was assuming it would be a Linear charge distribution with our Gaussian surface being that of a cylinder, the main reason being that my professor would always relate λ with a linear charge.
  10. K

    Gaussian surface (infinitely long cylindrical conductor)

    I made one mistake in which part A) is suppose to be r<a rather than r>a, sorry about that. Other than that everything else is written exactly, like how the problem stated it. I also believe L is suppose to represent the length of the cylinderical shell.
  11. K

    Gaussian surface (infinitely long cylindrical conductor)

    Homework Statement An infinitely long, cylindrical, conducting shell of inner radius b and outer radius c has a total charge Q. A line of uniform charge distribution Λ is placed along the axis of the shell. Using Gauss's Law and justifying each step, determine. A) The Electric Field for r>a...
  12. K

    How do i figure out area under the the red-brown line graph?

    Now I see what you did, this method seems a lot simpler than what I was originally thinking. When I calculate the ΔV/Δt it will give me acceleration which I can then use to find the distance, I think I've got the hang of this now.
  13. K

    How do i figure out area under the the red-brown line graph?

    It was one of the only ways that I knew how to find the area under the line, since I haven't learned how to integrate yet.
  14. K

    How do i figure out area under the the red-brown line graph?

    Yes, I've been trying to use the trapezoid rule
Top