Recent content by Vatsal Goyal

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    Problem in understaning potential energy

    Yes, I think it would, suppose the block is at height h in the beginning. We lift it by a distance x with velocity u. Now, if we drop it, when it reaches height h, it will have velocity v>u as only force of gravity is acting on it, hence total energy at h is greater than what it was before, then...
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    Problem in understaning potential energy

    It is defined as the energy a body has due to its position or configuration, and measured by the work that could be done by a body passing from its present position to some zero position.
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    Problem in understaning potential energy

    It should gain some energy, as when we will release the block, the block will gain kinetic energy, indicating it must have had some form of energy at the height which is converted into kinetic energy.
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    Problem in understaning potential energy

    Homework Statement If we lift a block with constant velocity, by applying a force mg upwards, is the work done zero? Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution The work done must be zero as the resultant force is zero, what I don't understand is how does the block get potential energy if...
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    Direction of friction in circular motion

    Thank you so much @CWatters and @haruspex, this makes so much more sense to me now! :dademyday:
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    Direction of friction in circular motion

    Could you help me understand why it is the frictional force that provides centripetal acceleration. I am taught that frictional force acts opposite to the slipping tendency, then why does it act radially inwards if the slipping tendency is tangential.
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    Direction of friction in circular motion

    Homework Statement I can't understand why friction acts radially inwards when a body is rotating on a rough turntable. If the friction is removed, the body would move tangentially, hence it has slipping tendency tangential, not radially outwards, then shouldn't friction act tangentially...
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    Circular motion

    Ohh I didn't see that, thank you! But how do I justify the book's approach, I don't understand why their answer is correct. They have divided the magnitude of component of velocity perpendicular to position vector by the magnitude of position vector.
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    Circular motion

    Its [v sin^2(theta)]/b
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    Circular motion

    No the book had a diagram, and angle is clearly marked with horizontal, similar to the one I have drawn in the post above.
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    Circular motion

    Thats what I am getting, but the answer is different in the book, I checked the solutions and what they had done is that they took component of velocity perpendicular to position vector and then differentiated, I have a feeling that its wrong because thats not what my teacher taught, what do you...
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    Circular motion

    Homework Statement A particle is moving parallel to x-axis in the positive direction with velocity v such that at all the instants the y -axis component of its position vector is constant and is equal to 'b'. Find angular velocity about origin. Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution I...
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    Hybridisation doubt

    I don't get it, how would the orbitals be arranged in fluorine then?
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    Hybridisation doubt

    No, I don't think it would. Is that somehow related to the answer?
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    Hybridisation doubt

    There is an example given in my textbook showing the structure of BF3. In it, they have hybridised the orbitals of B to sp2, but not of F. It's written sp2-p overlapping. Why isn't flourine also hybridised, seeing it has 3 lone pairs and 1 bond pair, it could have sp3 hybridisation? Also, in...
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