2 large objects of equal mass, Will they move each other?

In summary, two planets the size of Jupiter with the same mass, separated by a distance of 10 times their diameter and at rest, will start moving towards each other due to gravitational attraction described by Newton's law of motion and general relativity. This is similar to two objects connected by a spring, and the concept of "center of mass" is relevant in this scenario.
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RobertSpencer
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Suppose there are 2 planets the size (diameter) of Jupiter. Both have the exact same mass. They are separated by a distance of about 10 times the diameter of the planet. They are both at rest. Now, will they start moving towards each other or stay in the same place?

This is a sort of thought experiment. So, you can imagine they have no initial velocity and are in rest with respect to each other and that there are no other big objects nearby.
 
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  • #2
They will start moving towards each other due to gravitational attraction, as described by Newton's law of motion and by general relativity.
 
  • #3
Yes, of course.
 
  • #5
RobertSpencer said:
Suppose there are 2 planets the size (diameter) of Jupiter. Both have the exact same mass. They are separated by a distance of about 10 times the diameter of the planet. They are both at rest. Now, will they start moving towards each other or stay in the same place?

This is a sort of thought experiment. So, you can imagine they have no initial velocity and are in rest with respect to each other and that there are no other big objects nearby.

This is no different than two objects of the same mass connected to each other via a spring. If you are familiar with that, then the scenario you described is analogous.

BTW, this is a good point for you to look up the concept of "center of mass".

Zz.
 
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1. What is the gravitational force between two large objects of equal mass?

The gravitational force between two objects is determined by the masses of the objects and the distance between them. In the case of two large objects of equal mass, the gravitational force between them would be equal and opposite, causing them to move towards each other.

2. Will the direction of movement be affected by the masses of the objects?

Yes, the direction of movement will be affected by the masses of the objects. The larger the mass of an object, the stronger its gravitational force will be, causing it to exert a greater pull on the other object.

3. What if the distance between the two objects is increased?

If the distance between the two objects is increased, the gravitational force between them will decrease. This means that the objects will move towards each other at a slower rate and with less force.

4. Will the objects eventually collide with each other?

In theory, yes, the objects will eventually collide with each other due to the force of gravity pulling them towards each other. However, this collision may not occur if there are other forces at play, such as the objects moving in different directions.

5. What is the formula for calculating the gravitational force between two objects?

The formula for calculating the gravitational force between two objects is F = G * (m1 * m2)/r^2, where F is the force, G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the objects, and r is the distance between them.

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