1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A beam of red light has twice the intensity as a second bean of the same color

  1. May 11, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A beam of red light has twice the intensity as a second bean of the same color. Calculate the ratio of the amplitude of wave.

    2. Relevant equations
    [tex]intensity \propto (amplitude)^2[/tex]

    3. The attempt at a solution
    [tex]1^{st} \mbox{ beam} = 2I[/tex]
    [tex]2^{nd} \mbox{ beam} = I[/tex]

    I don't know if this step is correct and I don't know what to do next?!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2008 #2
    [tex]I_1=2 I_2[/tex]

    [tex]\frac{I_1}{I_2}=2[/tex]

    What can you do to the above relation (given your relevant equation) to convert it to a ratio of amplitudes?

    Regards,

    Bill
     
  4. May 11, 2008 #3
    [tex]intensity \propto (amplitude)^2[/tex]

    So, it will be [tex]1:4[/tex] ?
     
  5. May 11, 2008 #4

    Defennder

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    No, start off by expressing both intensities I = kA^2. Then compare the ratio of each amplitude to the other.
     
  6. May 11, 2008 #5
    No. Try what Defennder suggested to see why.

    Regards,

    Bill
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: A beam of red light has twice the intensity as a second bean of the same color
  1. Color of Light (Replies: 5)

Loading...