A better way of excercising

  • Thread starter Pengwuino
  • Start date
  • #26
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
Math Is Hard said:
I think you guys are missing my point. If you eat too many (digestable)calories, the body is going to store the excess as fat.
This is wrong.

For someone with a slow metabolism, this is true. For someone with a high metabolism, it is false.

When I trained, I ate 2.5 times more than my recommended amount of calories. So, my recommended was like 2000 calories and I was eating 4500 calories a day. All healthy except the ice cream. Believe it or not, I lost fat.

I increased my metabolism to a high-level where I can eat anything I wanted without worries to gaining weight (but of course I wasn't too stupid to do that).

A large person can not do this because their metabolism is really slow. Your body does not want to burn calories and decides to store it as fat. But for a fast metabolism person, it never stores anything as fat unless it is absolutely necessary otherwise it burns it. Someone with a fast metabolism has to eat consistently throughout the day because the body demands it. This why the body does not store the calories. Because you are eating 6-7 times a day (little snacks and meals) your body does not feel the need to preserve any calories because the next meal is coming up in just 2 hours or so. With larger people though, they tend to eat less times per day, but larger meals. So the body is not certain on when the next meal is, so it stores it. Or larger people on a "diet" (the most common cut back on calories diet) eat less frequently with less calories as the regular large guy is actually SLOWING HIS/HER METABOLISM EVEN MORE! So when this person goes on a binge one day, everything is STORED AS FAT because the body can't rely on eating enough.

Anyways, I'm done my talking.

Just see a personal trainer or a nutritinist/dietician before starting anything. Most people actually go in the WRONG direction because they think it's simple common sense to diet. Be careful on which trainers/nutritinists/dieticians you see too because some of them will risk your body just so you see results quickly and so it is easier to keep you as a client and suck your money away.

Well, the stuff I said above can be wrong but I don't think so. I didn't go into detail because I don't know any details and that's why I stopped and can't say it's completely true.

Note: I should be a Certified Personal Trainer by the end of this year. I have a lot of studying to do. Although getting the certification isn't too difficuld, I just want to be a quality trainer who trains his clients safely and efficiently.

Cheers.
 
Last edited:
  • #27
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,527
28
MIH said:
If you eat too many (digestable)calories, the body is going to store the excess as fat.
JasonRox said:
This is wrong.

For someone with a slow metabolism, this is true. For someone with a high metabolism, it is false.
I disagree. Even a person with a fast metabolism could consume too many calories. He/she would just have to consume many more calories to be in excess.

My friend has a naturally fast metabolism. She hated being stick-thin so she increased her caloric intake. Result: she put on some weight. She put on some FAT, which was what she wanted because she wanted some boobs and hips. She took in more calories per day than her body could use up - and voila!
 
  • #28
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
Math Is Hard said:
I disagree. Even a person with a fast metabolism could consume too many calories. He/she would just have to consume many more calories to be in excess.

My friend has a naturally fast metabolism. She hated being stick-thin so she increased her caloric intake. Result: she put on some weight. She put on some FAT, which was what she wanted because she wanted some boobs and hips. She took in more calories per day than her body could use up - and voila!
Naturally fast, and that's the problem.

She slowed it down by eating improperly and not exercising.

Note: Like I said, I used up more calories than my body could use up but because I was doing it properly my metabolism went even faster. At one point I actually had to have a snack next to my bed because I'd always wake up hungry even after eating 4500 calories a day!

Note: You can still eat too many calories, but too many people obsess about eating 200 calories over. That's just pathetic.
 
  • #29
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,527
28
JasonRox said:
Naturally fast, and that's the problem.

She slowed it down by eating improperly and not exercising.
And the net result was that she consumed more calories than she could burn and she gained weight. The excess calories were stored as fat.
 
  • #30
Evo
Mentor
23,161
2,857
Math Is Hard said:
And the net result was that she consumed more calories than she could burn and she gained weight. The excess calories were stored as fat.
Yes, any time you eat more calories than you burn, they will get stored as fat.

JasonRox, you obviously weren't eating calories in excess of what you were burning. I know of no magic where excess calories just disappear. If you are burning a high rate of calories due to your level of excersize and metabolism, it may have seemed to you like no matter how much you ate, you could not gain weight, however if you reached a point where you started eating more than you burned, you would start gaining weight, unless you have a rare disorder, but you would more than likely know it. I can't remember the name of the disorder, I haven't read about it in several years. I'm really surprised that you plan to be a personal trainer, yet you don't understand what MIH said. That's pretty basic.

Also, eating 200 calories per day more than you burn may seem like nothing to you, but that's 6,000 excess calories per month, in one year, that meager 200 calories adds up to a weight gain of over 20 pounds. I agree though that people shouldn't obsess if they go over one day, just as long as they don't go over consistently.
 
Last edited:
  • #31
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
Math Is Hard said:
And the net result was that she consumed more calories than she could burn and she gained weight. The excess calories were stored as fat.
Also, how can you say it's from eating?

How do we not know that this was going to occur anyways? And it's just a coincidence that it happened on her dieting time.

During high school, I ate fast food about 10 times a week and never gained a pound! I work at the school cafetaria and Burger King. Naturally fast metabolism and I ate more than I should have. I wasn't active either. I did this for 11 months exact. (I worked at Burger King for 11 months.)
 
  • #32
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
Evo said:
Yes, any time you eat more calories than you burn, they will get stored as fat.

JasonRox, you obviously weren't eating calories in excess of what you were burning. I know of no magic where excess calories just disappear. If you are burning a high rate of calories due to your level of excersize and metabolism, it may have seemed to you like no matter how much you ate, you could not gain weight, however if you reached a point where you started eating more than you burned, you would start gaining weight, unless you have a rare disorder, but you would more than likely know it. I can't remember the name of the disorder, I haven't read about it in several years. I'm really surprised that you plan to be a personal trainer, yet you don't understand what MIH said. That's pretty basic.

Also, eating 200 calories per day more than you burn may seem like nothing to you, but that's 6,000 excess calories per month, in one year, that meager 200 calories adds up to a weight gain of over 20 pounds. I agree though that people shouldn't obsess if they go over one day, just as long as they don't go over consistently.
Yes, eating more causes you to gain. But faster metabolism burn more calories during rest periods.

If I weight 150 pounds and I have a fast metabolism, and another is the same weight and completely identical but now has a slow metabolism, the doctor will recommend us both to eat 2000 calories a day. Unfortunately, I can eat 2500 and be fine, but the other can not. My "maximum" is much higher than perceived.

So, yeah my body was still burning the calories no doubt.

Note: Naturally, I wouldn't go against what the doctor says, but the doctor will let you know to learn your about your own body. That way you learn what's best for you.

Note: Personal Trainers do not deal with diets.
 
  • #33
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,527
28
JasonRox said:
Also, how can you say it's from eating?
Because she increased her caloric intake but didn't change her activity level.
How do we not know that this was going to occur anyways? And it's just a coincidence that it happened on her dieting time.
When she doesn't keep her calories up, her weight goes down. This is an ongoing situation with her.

During high school, I ate fast food about 10 times a week and never gained a pound! I work at the school cafetaria and Burger King. Naturally fast metabolism and I ate more than I should have. I wasn't active either. I did this for 11 months exact. (I worked at Burger King for 11 months.)
Then you weren't eating "more than you should have". (Whether you were eating "what you should have" nutritionally, that's a whole different story.) But strictly in terms of caloric intake, your body was burning up all the calories you were consuming, so you weren't overeating.
 
  • #34
6,265
1,280
Ronnin said:
Also, fat doesn't require energy to maintain, but muscle does does, so for every pound of fat you trade for muscle the more energy you expend just doing nothing (so you can eat more and not gain)
quasi426 said:
Weight training increases muscle mass. The more muscle you have the more calories you burn doing anything i.e. sleeping, running, thinking. This is because it one you weigh more and must do more work for a given activity, also muscle itself must be maintained which costs calories, lastly muscles burn sugar and therefore the more of this burning machinery you have the more you will burn.
These seem to be the explanation for Jason's Magic Fast Metabolism. Having more muscle burns more calories in and of itself.
 
  • #35
253
0
JasonRox said:
During high school, I ate fast food about 10 times a week and never gained a pound! I work at the school cafetaria and Burger King. Naturally fast metabolism and I ate more than I should have. I wasn't active either. I did this for 11 months exact. (I worked at Burger King for 11 months.)
I knew a guy back in my hometown that was exactly like this and could not gain weight. He wanted to gain weight however and me and another friend feelt like playing a prank on him(this was a couple of years ago and teens sure are dickheads hehe).

So we told him that besides hes regular meals he should add 2 or 3 shakes each day that that contains 40grams of olive oil, 60grams of wheyprotein and 100grams of dextrose. Thats 1000kcal in every shake and a gross amount of high gi carbs along with lots of fat:rofl:

Sure enough the insulin spikes in addition to the fat made him gain (not quite all muscle though) :biggrin: :tongue:
 
Last edited:
  • #36
253
0
zoobyshoe said:
These seem to be the explanation for Jason's Magic Fast Metabolism. Having more muscle burns more calories in and of itself.
I think the extra kcal burned is just something around 20kcal/pound of muscle if not less. Dont quote me on that number but its nothing magical. I havent noticed that much of a difference in my metabolism over the last 3 years even though I have added around 25ibs of lean body mass to my frame.

according to this site its only 3-4kcal/ib of muscle
http://www.optimalhealthpartner.com/Media/Myth of muscle as calorie burner.htm
I have no way of knowing how accurate it is though.
 
  • #37
6,265
1,280
Azael said:
I think the extra kcal burned is just something around 20kcal/pound of muscle if not less. Dont quote me on that number but its nothing magical. I havent noticed that much of a difference in my metabolism over the last 3 years even though I have added around 25ibs of lean body mass to my frame.

according to this site its only 3-4kcal/ib of muscle
http://www.optimalhealthpartner.com/Media/Myth of muscle as calorie burner.htm
I have no way of knowing how accurate it is though.
That site, if accurate, essentially debunks the notion that alot of muscle burns alot of calories without doing anything special. The advantage of a large muscle mass for calorie burning is quite negligible.

What's kcal mean? You're writing "3-4kcal" while the sit says "3-4 calories".
 
  • #38
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,527
28
1 Calorie = 1 kilocalorie(kcal) = 1000 calories, but...
Colloquially, and in nutrition and food labelling, the term "calorie" almost always refers to the kilogram calorie. This applies only to English text; if an energy measurement is given using a unit symbol then the scientific practice prevails there. A convention of capitalising "Calorie" to refer to the kilogram calorie, with uncapitalised "calorie" referring to the gram calorie, is sometimes proposed, but neither recognized in any official standards, nor commonly followed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilocalorie

Crazy, eh? I seem to remember that they are more fond of using the term "kcal" in England than in the U.S. - I think I remember seeing it on the food labels, but it has been a long time since I was over there. Can someone tell me if that's correct?
 
  • #39
somasimple
Gold Member
756
5
Hi,

It was a forgotten time of great Calorie = 1000 little calories.
 

Related Threads on A better way of excercising

  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
12K
Replies
23
Views
15K
Replies
8
Views
14K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
4K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
35
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
797
Top