A positive charge of magnitude Q1 = 8.5 nC is located....

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the x-component of the electric field at point P due to a positive charge located at the origin and a negative charge located on the positive x-axis. The formula used is Efield = (K)(Q)/(r2) and the correct answer is 383.716 N/C.
  • #1
brioches
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Homework Statement


A positive charge of magnitude Q1 = 8.5 nC is located at the origin. A negative charge Q2 = -8.5 nC is located on the positive x-axis at x = 16.5 cm from the origin. The point P is located y = 7.5 cm above charge Q2. Calculate the x-component of the electric field at point P due to charge Q1. Write your answer in units of N/C.

Homework Equations



Efield = (K)(Q)/(r2)

The Attempt at a Solution


I found the E-field created by Q1 by doing (k)(Q1)/(r2). I found r to be .18125 by performing the Pythagorean Theorem on the x and y legs. I then multiplied this answer by x/r because it asks for just the x-component, which is the E-field times cos(θ), and cos(θ) is adjacent/hypotenuse. I got 421.506 for the E-field and .910345 for cos(θ), and after multiplying these, I got 383.716, which is not the right answer. Any help is much appreciated.
 
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  • #2
brioches said:
I got 421.506
You seem to have used kq/r, not kq/r2.
 
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  • #3
haruspex said:
You seem to have used kq/r, not kq/r2.
Welp, that was definitely it. Thanks so much!
 

Related to A positive charge of magnitude Q1 = 8.5 nC is located....

1. What is the magnitude of the positive charge Q1?

The magnitude of the positive charge Q1 is 8.5 nC, or 8.5 nanocoulombs.

2. Where is the positive charge Q1 located?

The positive charge Q1 is located at a specific point in space, but the exact location is not specified in the given statement.

3. What does the unit "nC" mean?

The unit "nC" stands for nanocoulombs, which is a unit of electric charge equal to one billionth of a coulomb.

4. How does the magnitude of Q1 affect the electric field around it?

The magnitude of Q1 affects the electric field around it by creating a field that decreases in strength as the distance from the charge increases. The electric field is directly proportional to the magnitude of the charge.

5. What other information do we need to calculate the electric field at a specific point due to Q1?

In order to calculate the electric field at a specific point due to Q1, we also need to know the distance between the point and the charge, the direction of the electric field (which is determined by the sign of the charge), and any other charges that may be present in the surrounding area.

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