Question of electricity net force

In summary, the conversation discusses three point charges located on the positive x-axis and the net force exerted on one of the charges by the other two. There is confusion about the direction and calculation of the forces, with one person suggesting that the forces should be added instead of subtracted. A sketch is recommended to clarify the situation.
  • #1
toesockshoe
265
2

Homework Statement



Three point charges are located on the positive x-axis of a coordinate system. Charge q1 = 1.0 nC is 2.0 cm from the origin, charge q2 = -3.5 nC is 4.0 cm from the origin and charge q3 = 6.0 nC located at the origin. What is the net force ((a)magnitude and (b) direction) on charge q1 = 1.0 nCexerted by the other two charges?

The online homework grader is marknig my answer for part a wrong. Can someone tell me what's wrong with my solution for part a? My work is in the attachment.

2. Homework Equations

see attachment

The Attempt at a Solution


[/B]
see the attachment for my solution. The online homework grader is saying my answer is wrong.
 

Attachments

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  • #2
Check the locations of the individual charges. q3 is at the origin according the problem description. Your image has it off to the right.
 
  • #3
It looks like you maybe placed the charges in the wrong spots? q3 is at the origin, q1 is at 2cm and q2 is at 4cm. So there is a repulsive force to the right from q3 on q1, and an attractive force to the right from q2 on q1...

EDIT: Rats, rats, rats, rats, rats! :cry:
 
  • #4
if the pic isn't clear enough, here is a close up.
berkeman said:
It looks like you maybe placed the charges in the wrong spots? q3 is at the origin, q1 is at 2cm and q2 is at 4cm. So there is a repulsive force to the right from q3 on q1, and an attractive force to the right from q2 on q1...

EDIT: Rats, rats, rats, rats, rats! :cry:
oh i fixed that. [tex] F_{q3q1} [/tex] should be 1.35x10^-4. The answer though is sitll wrong. I subtract the two forces because one pair is attractive while the other force is repulsive. The answer I get is 5.625x10^-5. The answer from homework grader gave me is 2.1x10^-4. This is what you would get if you add the two forces. Why would you add them?
 
  • #5
What directions do the two force vectors point? Make a sketch.
 
  • #6
gneill said:
What directions do the two force vectors point? Make a sketch.
oh yeah. i see the problem. thank you.
 
  • Like
Likes berkeman

Related to Question of electricity net force

What is electricity net force?

Electricity net force is the overall force that is exerted on an electric charge. It is the sum of all the individual forces acting on the charge, including electric and magnetic forces.

How is electricity net force calculated?

Electricity net force is calculated using the equation F=qE, where F is the net force, q is the electric charge, and E is the electric field strength. This equation takes into account both the magnitude and direction of the electric force.

What are some factors that can affect electricity net force?

Factors that can affect electricity net force include the magnitude of the electric charge, the distance between charges, and the presence of other charges in the surrounding area. Additionally, the material properties of the objects involved can also impact the net force.

Why is electricity net force important?

Understanding electricity net force is crucial in many aspects of science and technology. It helps us understand the behavior of electric charges and how they interact with each other. It is also essential in fields such as electronics and electromagnetism.

How can electricity net force be manipulated?

Electricity net force can be manipulated by changing the electric field strength or the magnitude of the charge. It can also be influenced by altering the distance between charges or the material properties of the objects involved. In some cases, external forces can also be applied to change the net force on a charge.

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