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A question to STEM graduates 2008-present

  1. immediately prior to or upon graduation

    4 vote(s)
    44.4%
  2. 3-6 months after graduation

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  3. >6 months to < 1 year after graduation

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  4. 1-2 years after graduation

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  5. > 2 years after graduation

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Still unemployed

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Other

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
  1. Dec 2, 2014 #1

    StatGuy2000

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    Education Advisor

    Hi everyone. I just I would pose this question to those who graduated with a STEM degree between the years of 2008 to the present. I wanted to find out among those graduates, how long it took you to find employment (whether full time, contract, or part-time).

    Part of the reason I'm posting this thread is that the years I've highlighted are the time period when the Great Recession struck the US (and of course other countries around the world). So it's worth gauging how easily STEM graduates (whether BS, MS, or PhD) who post on PF fared.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 2, 2014 #2
    I think the term 'STEM' is too broad to get an accurate picture of what exactly is going on. I'm sure the people who fit the 'TE' have had little time finding work, while that certainly may not be the case for those with 'SM' backgrounds.
     
  4. Dec 2, 2014 #3

    StatGuy2000

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    Education Advisor

    I'm not so certain about that, because at least anecdotally I have heard of stories about those with engineering degrees having difficulty finding work as well, depending on where they happen to be located. What I wanted to see is, among those on PF who graduated from STEM programs from 2008-present, how long did it take for them to find work.
     
  5. Dec 2, 2014 #4
    STEM graduates always tend to fare very well because employers from a variety of sectors value the skills they gain during their degree.

    A better question would be: how quickly did STEM graduates find employment in the field that pertains to their degree?

    I would be particularly interested in hearing whether the recession made it harder for STEM graduates to find jobs in the field that their degree was in, meaning more had to work in other sectors. In many fields of STEM (mainly the S), it's actually very difficult to find relevant work upon graduation, especially relevant work that pays well. Hence, many go take jobs in other areas, e.g. accountancy, or banking. So, did the recession make more chemists have to train as accountants?

    My degree was in engineering and I found work soon after graduating. Most of my coursemates had jobs lined up before they graduated. All in engineering. But I studied in an area where there was a big demand for engineers; one of the strongest in the UK in fact. The recession badly hit many areas of engineering, particularly the construction industry, which hit civil engineering graduates the hardest. I'm in energy, and I don't think that it was hit nearly as hard as other areas.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2014 #5
    I too am more curious about the people who were able to find jobs that were relevant to their degree ( at least for those who wanted to).
    I am leaving my field of interest because I am aware that the probability of me ever getting work in it is nearly 0%. I will pursue another field in S or maybe E (possibly T) and hopefully my answer will change to your poll.
     
  7. Dec 3, 2014 #6

    MarneMath

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    Education Advisor

    Hmm, I'm not sure how 'Statistics' fits into the whole relevant to field aspsect. My first 'real job' after graduation was my desired job doing stochastic modeling for a financial company. I then worked for the government doing bio-statistics. Now, while I complete my PhD, i'm working in the private sector doing so called 'Big Data' for a telecommunication company. All three fields are pretty different, but in all honesty, I feel like I'm doing the same work :w

    *I feel that I should note that I've only had one job with the title as Statistician.
     
  8. Dec 3, 2014 #7
    Sorry for my stupidity, and I also have no personal experience to share, but does CS fall into T?
     
  9. Dec 3, 2014 #8
    Took me over 2 years to find work in a STEM field that has nothing to do with my physics degrees, but is still full time. I did get part time restaurant work about a year or so after graduation, so I put 1-2 years.
     
  10. Dec 3, 2014 #9

    StatGuy2000

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    Just out of curiosity, did you graduate from your physics degrees within the 2008-present time frame?
     
  11. Dec 3, 2014 #10

    StatGuy2000

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    Education Advisor

    Yes.
     
  12. Dec 3, 2014 #11
    Yes, both of them.
     
  13. Dec 9, 2014 #12
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
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