Acceleration and Velocity: Understanding the Relationship

In summary, the conversation discusses the correlation between acceleration and velocity. The speaker advises the questioner to do their own research before asking questions, as it helps in providing a more focused and helpful answer. The definitions of velocity and acceleration are also mentioned to highlight the correlation between the two. The conversation ends with the speaker suggesting the questioner to come back with a more carefully considered question in a new thread.
  • #1
ghanaba
2
0
Is there a correlation between acceleration and velocity?
If acceleration is rising will the velocity also rise?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Did you look this up before asking your question?
 
  • #3
ugh how does that affect the question?
if i had a clear understanding i won't be posting it here..
 
  • #4
What do you think about it? Your question reads as if you have not read anything about the topic.. PF is not an Elementary Physics Question and Answer Service. Go to Wikipedia and look up the definitions of Velocity and Acceleration, think about what you have actually asked and then ask a question that shows you have actually put some effort in. Once you put in something of your own in, you will find PF will help you further. Really.
 
  • #5
ghanaba said:
Ugh how does that affect the question?
It matters because if we don't know how much you already know, we don't know where to start in answering your question. If you do a bit more research yourself, you'll be able to come back with a more focused question, something along the lines of "I understand this, and this, but not that - what am I not seeing?" and we can help you past the hard spot.

Without that, all we can do is spit out the definitions: Velocity is the first derivative of position; acceleration is the first derivative of velocity. That certainly states the correlation between the two, but is it a helpful answer? probably not, but it's the best anyone can do until you've put more into the question yourself.

This thread is closed, but please feel free to come back with a more carefully considered question a new thread.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes davenn

Related to Acceleration and Velocity: Understanding the Relationship

1. What is acceleration and how is it different from velocity?

Acceleration is the rate of change of an object's velocity over time. It is different from velocity because velocity is the rate of change of an object's position over time. In simpler terms, acceleration measures how quickly an object's speed is changing, while velocity measures how fast an object is moving and in what direction.

2. How are acceleration and velocity related?

Acceleration and velocity are closely related, as acceleration is a factor in determining an object's velocity. If an object is accelerating, its velocity will change over time. This means that the object will either speed up, slow down, or change direction. On the other hand, if an object is moving at a constant velocity, there is no acceleration present.

3. What is the formula for calculating acceleration?

The formula for calculating acceleration is: a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is acceleration, vf is final velocity, vi is initial velocity, and t is time. This formula can also be written as a = ∆v / ∆t, where ∆v is the change in velocity and ∆t is the change in time.

4. How does mass affect acceleration and velocity?

Mass does not directly affect acceleration, but it does have an impact on an object's velocity. According to Newton's Second Law of Motion, the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. This means that a larger mass will require a greater force to accelerate it, resulting in a slower change in velocity.

5. Can an object have a constant velocity and still be accelerating?

No, an object cannot have a constant velocity and still be accelerating. As mentioned earlier, acceleration is a factor in determining an object's velocity. If an object's velocity is constant, there is no acceleration present. However, an object can maintain a constant velocity while changing direction, which would result in a change in velocity and therefore, acceleration.

Similar threads

Replies
6
Views
934
Replies
14
Views
349
Replies
4
Views
898
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Mechanics
Replies
3
Views
579
Replies
1
Views
654
Replies
8
Views
892
Replies
6
Views
746
Back
Top