Acetone derived from conventional petroleum?

In summary, the question at hand is whether or not acetone can be considered to be derived from conventional petroleum. Acetone is primarily produced through the catalytic dehydrogenation of isopropanol, but it is unclear if isopropanol itself is derived from petroleum. The classification question for registering acetone with the NYS health dept asks if it is derived solely from conventional petroleum, heavy oil deposits, coal, tar sands, and/or oil sands. However, after searching the web and consulting with chemistry experts, a definitive answer cannot be found. A clear definition of "derived" is needed in order to determine the correct classification for acetone.
  • #1
manhattan1nyc
Would Acetone be considered to be derived from conventional petroleum?
In the truest sense of the term "derived from conventional petroleum"
I have to answer the question yes or no so a final yes or know in the end would be very helpful. I know that acetone (dimethyl ketone) is produced chiefly by catalytic dehydrogenation of isopropanol and I searched the web for at least an hour to try to find out if it's considered to be derived from conventional petroleum in the truest sense of the term but couldn't find a definitive answer.

Thanks
Anthony
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Petroleum, as I understand it, is a mix of a lot of hydrocarbons and ther organic compounds. Do you know if acetone can be one of those? (i.e. can/do oil refineries separate out acetone from petrol?) Also, you know how lots of acetone is produced... by some reaction involving isopropanol... does isopropanol come from the mix? Or can isopropaol be made from some other things in petrol? Because one could go down the reaction line for a while... you probably need to clearly define what "derived" means and just write down a good argument...
 
  • #3
I'm not sure if isopropanol is refined from petroleum, I can't seem to find an answer to that on the web. Whe're using acetone and we have to register it with the NYS health dept and the classification question asks: "Is the chemical derived only from conventional petroleum, heavy oil deposits, coal, tar sands and/or oil sands?" and the choice of answers is Yes or No. People in this forum are chemistry geniuses so when I got stumped after trying to research it on the web I thought to ask here.
 

Related to Acetone derived from conventional petroleum?

1. What is acetone derived from conventional petroleum?

Acetone is a clear, colorless liquid that is derived from conventional petroleum through a distillation process. It is a highly flammable and volatile organic compound commonly used as a solvent in various industries.

2. How is acetone extracted from conventional petroleum?

Acetone is extracted from conventional petroleum through a process called fractional distillation. This involves heating the crude oil and collecting the different components as they evaporate at different temperatures.

3. What are the main uses of acetone derived from conventional petroleum?

Acetone is primarily used as a solvent in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and plastics. It is also used as a raw material in the production of other chemicals, such as methyl methacrylate and bisphenol-A.

4. Is acetone derived from conventional petroleum harmful to the environment?

Acetone derived from conventional petroleum is considered a volatile organic compound (VOC), which can contribute to air pollution and smog. However, it is not considered a major environmental hazard and is not classified as a hazardous air pollutant by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

5. Are there any alternatives to using acetone derived from conventional petroleum?

Yes, there are alternative methods for producing acetone that do not involve conventional petroleum. One method is using bio-based sources, such as fermentation of corn or sugar. Additionally, some companies are exploring the use of non-petroleum sources, such as coal or natural gas, to produce acetone.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
833
  • Differential Equations
Replies
1
Views
767
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
34
Views
880
Replies
16
Views
2K
Replies
24
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
8K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
1
Views
3K
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
26
Views
2K
Back
Top