Adding an expected salary into CV

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Is it a good idea to add an expected range of salary at the beginning of one's CV (in case one would like to apply for a job in a company that offers a negotiable price) ?

Yesterday I added mine into one CV to post for a developer position. (I don't think they agree to pay me that high, so I might not get any call from them), another CV I sent out for a Senior position without mentioning the price.
 
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  • #2
UltrafastPED
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The CV is your history of work and academics; it is not a place to start salary negotiations. If you feel that you must provide this information, do it in a separate letter. Or better yet, you should inquire about salary range after a successful first interview.
 
  • #3
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The CV is your history of work and academics; it is not a place to start salary negotiations. If you feel that you must provide this information, do it in a separate letter.....
But why is that ? I would like to understand what possible negative views potential employer may have about a candidate whose CV is included with a price. I personally find it perfectly fine since sometimes many job ads I read also ask their applicants to include their desired salary amounts.
 
  • #4
UltrafastPED
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Look up "salary negotiating strategies" - I got over 3 million hits. Read a few of these...
 
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phinds
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But why is that ? I would like to understand what possible negative views potential employer may have about a candidate whose CV is included with a price. I personally find it perfectly fine since sometimes many job ads I read also ask their applicants to include their desired salary amounts.
If I got a resume that had a salary requirement in it, I would toss it in the trash can under the assumption that the candidate is only interested in money, not the job. It is a TERRIBLE idea.
 
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If I got a resume that had a salary requirement in it, I would toss it in the trash can under the assumption that the candidate is only interested in money, not the job. It is a TERRIBLE idea.
I totally agree with you and I have never met anyone who works for the money, all of the people I have met tell me that they love their jobs and would always stay with the company for a very long time. They reason that they have a true passion for the jobs and they can learn a lot from their managers, all their skills improve and they sure get matured overtime and finally they can satiate their material needs which in turn supports much them with mental values.... I think I am one of them.
 
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  • #7
AlephZero
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If your figure is above the company's typical rate for the job, you lose. It's a waste of time interviewing a candidate who has already said they will turn down a job offer.

If your figure is below the company's typical rate for the job, you also lose, because it's a waste of time interviewing a candidate who is probably underqualified.

And even if if you guess right, you lose, as PHinds already said.
 
  • #8
Monique
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I totally agree with you and I have never met anyone who works for the money, all of the people I have met tell me that they love their jobs and would always stay with the company for a very long time. They reason that they have a true passion for the jobs and they can learn a lot from their managers, all their skills improve and they sure get matured overtime and finally they can satiate their material needs which in turn supports much them with mental values.... I think I am one of them.
Why would you then put it into your CV? If the company is interested in you and you are interested in the job, an appropriate salary can be agreed upon. Why would you want to make it a selection criterium before even meeting and discussing what would be involved?
 
  • #9
Borek
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If your figure is below the company's typical rate for the job, you also lose, because it's a waste of time interviewing a candidate who is probably underqualified.
Actually even if you are properly qualified but your figure is below, you lose, because in the end you will be working for less than they were ready to pay.
 
  • #10
Intrastellar
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Why would you then put it into your CV? If the company is interested in you and you are interested in the job, an appropriate salary can be agreed upon. Why would you want to make it a selection criterium before even meeting and discussing what would be involved?
he was being sarcastic
 
  • #11
Choppy
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I don't think it's a good idea.

When negotiating salary and benefits it's usually best to allow your potential employer to provide the first offer for several reasons...
1. This eliminates the potentiall for low-balling yourself.
2. This allows the employer to offer you more than you might have expected.
3. The potential employer is often more limited in the range they can work with (both on the top and the bottom end).

If the potential employer really requires a statement on expected earnings you are best to reply with something along the lines of "salary is negotiable, but I expect a salary that's competative with similar positions elsewhere."

Putting an expected salary on your CV also takes up value room that should otherwise be used to sell yourself.
 
  • #12
D H
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When negotiating salary and benefits it's usually best to allow your potential employer to provide the first offer for several reasons...
You omitted the key reason: He who mentions salary first loses. This is rule #1 in salary negotiations. That's why some companies want candidates to specify their salary requirements up front.

Needless to say, I think putting salary requirements on a resume is a bad idea.
 

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