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Quantum Additional QFT textbooks

  1. Jun 24, 2017 #1

    dyn

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    Hi.
    I'm self-studying QFT. I already have the books by Schwartz , Zee , Peskin and Mandl. I like to have as many books as possible. Would the book by Itzykson & Zuber be useful as a complement to these books or is it a bit out of date ?
    Also does anybody have any opinions on the book "From Classical to Quantum Fields " by Baulieu and Ilipoulos ?
    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2017 #2

    vanhees71

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    2016 Award

    Ityzkson&Zuber is a very nice book, if you already know some QFT. The only book, I'd explicitly NOT recommend is Zee's "Nutshell". It's an amusing read if you know QFT already, but it's not accurate enough to learn it from scratch. In other words, the nutshell is too small for what Zee wants to pack into it. My favorite as an introductory textbook is Schwartz.

    The ultimate reference is the three-volume work by Weinberg: S. Weinberg, Quantum theory of fields, 3 vols. Cambridge University Press

    On the other hand, I'm not sure that it is a good idea to start with too many books at once. It's better to check out some in the beginning (your university library is your friend!) and then choose one which fits your needs best. Often different books have different conventions (e.g., for the Minkoski metric for instance you have the choice between east- and west-coast convention), and this can be quite confusion (particularly for a beginner in the field).
     
  4. Jun 25, 2017 #3

    dyn

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    Thanks. I don't know any QFT at the moment. I'm just starting that journey. So i'm looking for books that start from the beginning. At the moment I like the look of Schwartz and the book by Lancaster "QFT for the gifted amateur". But from my experience self-studying QM I have found that it's impossible to have too many books ! But I don't want out of date information or strange conventions/notation as QFT is difficult enough already.
     
  5. Jun 25, 2017 #4
    You can use "Quantum Field Theory Demystified" by David McMohan, a Tata McGraw-Hill publication.

    And yes: self studying QFT is an appreciable endeavour. Have you finished Quantum mechanics?
     
  6. Jun 25, 2017 #5

    dyn

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    Thanks. I have finished QM. I do actually like the Mcmahon books on relativity , QM and QFT. I notice they get quite a bad rep on here but I think they are very good as introductions.
     
  7. Jun 25, 2017 #6
  8. Jun 25, 2017 #7
    I don't like books that have titles like "(Subject) - for dummies, for newbies, demystified, simplified etc ... ". I tried some but they were bad. They might be good on introductory topics but what is the point in reading a book after which you ought to read another. I prefer reading one good book rather 2 bad books.
     
  9. Jun 26, 2017 #8
    I disagree. Not all books with that subject (s) are bad. :oldgrumpy:
     
  10. Jun 26, 2017 #9
    I've never seen a better introduction than Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur. I don't recommend the Zee book, either, and the Demystified books never seem to demystify anything.
     
  11. Jun 27, 2017 #10

    Demystifier

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    Unless you are exceptionally smart, the point of reading a simple book is to prepare you for the difficult one.
     
  12. Jun 27, 2017 #11

    Demystifier

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  13. Jun 27, 2017 #12

    dyn

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    Is the book by Duncan a useful textbook for self-studying QFT from the beginning ? Does it cover everything that a standard textbook covers eg Peskin ?
    Also I notice the Harris book is from 1972. Is it still relevant and is the terminology and notation still up to date ?
     
  14. Jun 27, 2017 #13
    Klauber or Lancaster Blundell will be better for starting.

    In fact, there is another book that I like very much - it is not a QFT book exactly but describes the standard model pretty efficiently for a beginner (as a mini QFT introduction)

    The Standard Model in a Nutshell by Goldberg
     
  15. Jun 27, 2017 #14
    I recently started studying quantum field theory and after wasting a considerable amount of time going through a number of books, I chose
    • A First Book of Quantum Field Theory, 2nd Ed by Amitabha Lahiri and Palash B. Pal, Narosa
    • Lectures on Quantum Field Theory by Ashok Das, World Scientific.
    What I found very appealing about these books was that they appear to be self contained. However these books don't have a lot of exercises and for that I am referring to another book,
    • Problem Book in Quantum Field Theory, by Voja Radovanovic, Springer.
     
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