QFT books to continue after Schwartz

In summary, there are no other QFT courses available at the university, so the individual is seeking a book to further their understanding of QFT after completing a first course using Matthew Schwartz's "Quantum Field Theory and the Standard Model" book. They are considering Weinberg's book, which is highly regarded but also found to be difficult, and are seeking recommendations for other books at a similar level. The suggestion is made to try Duncan's book, which covers topics not found in Weinberg's book, such as representation theory of the Poincare group and the linked-cluster theorem. Both Weinberg and Duncan's books are highly recommended for a deeper understanding of QFT.
  • #1
leo.
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I have taken one first QFT course last year which used Matthew Schwartz "Quantum Field Theory and the Standard Model" book. The course went all the way to renormalization of QED, although path integrals weren't discussed.

Now I want to continue learning QFT and also I want to make a second read of the contents of the first course and I'm quite confused which book to pick.

There are no other QFT courses in the university, so that taking a more advanced second course isn't an option.

Now I confess that there are a few topics that in the way that Schwartz explained, I didn't really get it. Schwartz does a quite good job in teaching how to compute things, but there are a few things that I want to really understand a little better the underlying reason. One example of this is what Schwartz calls the "embedding of particles into fields". For me his explanation is highly confusing and handwavy.

Now it seems that Weinberg's book is actualy considered the best one (he expends one whole chapter to explain this embedding of particles into fields stuff). But I don't know why, I feel Weinberg's book extremely hard. I've tried a few times to go over it. It took me days to progress just a little and in the end I gave up.

So what are other books than Weinberg's that I can pick, considering I have already a one semestre course in QFT following Schwartz? I want both to review what I've seem and to progress in QFT further (learn path integrals, non-abelian gauge theories, etc).
 
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  • #3
I think Duncan and Weinberg together are the answer. Duncan covers many things that are not covered by Weinberg. My favorite is Sect. 10.5 "How to stop worrying about Haag's theorem" ;-))). My favorite chapters in Weinberg are those on representation theory of the Poincare group and particularly the emphasis on the importance of the linked-cluster theorem, which made me stop worrying about Einstein's "spooky action at a distance" quibble and the incompatibility of the Copenhagen doctrine and the unncessity of the socalled collapse of the quantum state.
 
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  • #4
vanhees71 said:
My favorite is Sect. 10.5 "How to stop worrying about Haag's theorem" ;-))).
Mine too. :smile:
 
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Related to QFT books to continue after Schwartz

What are some good QFT books to continue after Schwartz?

Some popular QFT books that are often recommended after Schwartz include "Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur" by Tom Lancaster and Stephen Blundell, "Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell" by A. Zee, "An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory" by Michael E. Peskin and Daniel V. Schroeder, and "A Modern Introduction to Quantum Field Theory" by Michele Maggiore.

What level of mathematics is required for QFT books after Schwartz?

Most QFT books that are recommended after Schwartz require a strong foundation in mathematics, including undergraduate level calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, and complex analysis. Some books may also require knowledge of group theory and differential geometry.

Are there any QFT books that focus on specific applications or areas of interest?

Yes, there are several QFT books that focus on specific applications or areas of interest, such as "Quantum Field Theory and the Standard Model" by Matthew D. Schwartz, which focuses on the Standard Model of particle physics, "Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetime and Black Hole Thermodynamics" by Robert M. Wald, which focuses on the application of QFT in curved spacetime and black hole physics, and "Quantum Field Theory for Mathematicians" by Robin Ticciati, which focuses on the mathematical foundations of QFT.

Can I learn QFT from online resources instead of books?

While there are many online resources available for learning QFT, such as lecture notes, video lectures, and problem sets, it is generally recommended to supplement these resources with a textbook. A textbook can provide a more comprehensive and structured approach to learning QFT, and can also serve as a valuable reference for future studies.

Are there any QFT books that are suitable for self-study?

Yes, there are several QFT books that are suitable for self-study, including "Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur" by Tom Lancaster and Stephen Blundell, "Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell" by A. Zee, and "A Modern Introduction to Quantum Field Theory" by Michele Maggiore. These books often provide clear explanations, examples, and exercises that make them suitable for self-study. However, it is important to also seek guidance from a mentor or join a study group to ensure a deeper understanding of the material.

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