Advice for useful math books for a college student studying physics

In summary, the conversation suggests that for a college student studying physics, it is recommended to look for math books in a specific forum or website, depending on their current knowledge level and preferences. At higher levels, multivariable calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra are important. A recommended book is Boas, Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences.
  • #1
3
0
Advice for useful math books for a college student studying physics
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Last edited:
  • #3
Barry Z said:
a college student studying physics
It will help people in giving advice, if you can be more specific. Are you at the introductory level, which needs mostly single-variable calculus and maybe simple differential equation? Or are you at the intermediate or advanced undergraduate level, or looking towards it?

At higher levels, the required math topics depend on the physics topics. Generally, multivariable (vector) calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra are the foundation.

A common recommendation for a wide-ranging math book beyond the introductory calculus level is Boas, Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences.

BvU said:
We have a whole forum on textbooks. A bit hard to summarize, so why don't you look around there ?
I see that "there" is now "here". :cool: One of the other mentors apparently moved this thread.
 
  • Like
Likes Barry Z

What are some good math books for a college student studying physics?

Some good math books for a college student studying physics include "Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences" by Mary L. Boas, "Mathematical Methods for Physicists" by George B. Arfken, and "An Introduction to Mechanics" by Daniel Kleppner and Robert Kolenkow.

Do I need to have a strong background in math to understand these books?

While having a strong background in math can certainly be helpful, these books are designed for college students studying physics and therefore assume a basic understanding of math concepts. Some may require more advanced knowledge, so it is important to carefully read the book descriptions and reviews before purchasing.

Are there any online resources that can supplement these books?

Yes, there are many online resources such as Khan Academy, MIT OpenCourseWare, and Coursera that offer free math courses and tutorials that can supplement these books. Additionally, many universities have online resources or tutoring services available for students.

Are there any specific editions or versions of these books that are recommended?

It is generally recommended to use the most recent edition of a textbook, as it will likely have updated information and may have corrected errors from previous editions. However, if a specific edition is required for a course, it is best to consult with the instructor.

Can these books be used for self-study or are they better suited for classroom use?

These books can definitely be used for self-study, but they may also be used in a classroom setting. It ultimately depends on the individual's learning style and needs. Some students may find it helpful to have a teacher or tutor to guide them through the material, while others may prefer to study on their own at their own pace.

Similar threads

  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
19
Views
1K
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
900
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
26
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
14
Views
3K
Back
Top