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Anti-gravity calculation for fun

  1. May 9, 2008 #1
    Alright, don't take this seriously. This is just a what if situation calculation:
    So I was thinking. Atoms possess charges. Particle possess mass. Charges produce electric field while mass produce gravitational field. A changing electric field produce a magnetic field. What unique about electric and magnetic field is that, to me, it's the same field of anti direction. If you charge a pole positive 1 side and negative on the other, the field is strictly inside the pole. Magnetic field effects outside the pole. Anyway, I was wondering if a changing gravity field produce anything similar. So far we ain't detecting anything that we know of. lol So I thought "maybe it's too little to detect". So i start doing calculation similar to magnetic field to see if it's inside or outside of our detecting scope.

    magnetic equation: B=u0I/(2piR) where u0=magnetic constant I=current R=radius of wire
    "magnity" equation :rofl: : GZ=kv/(2piR) k= some constant v=velocity R=radius of pipe .
    similar to u0 calculation, I calculated k=1.67 x 10^-7 (standard metric units)
    Let's a sume I have a pipe with water inside. The pipe diameter is 1m. I want to experience a GZ of 1m/s^2 (aobut 1/10 of earth gravity). The calculation come out to be
    v=1.88x10^7 m/s . Approx 6% speed of light. I conclude that it's outside of our detection. What do you think?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 9, 2008 #2

    Danger

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    We need SpaceTiger or one of the other cosmologists/astronomers to confirm this, but I believe that gravity fields change quite frequently. Take neutron stars or black holes as an example. While the overall gravitational influence remains the same during collapse, the shape of the field changes due to the mass being more concentrated.
     
  4. May 9, 2008 #3
    This is what blast me. There are various experiments reported that they detect a gravity field change when rotate a disk at very high speed. Yet no one believe them.
     
  5. May 9, 2008 #4

    Danger

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    Where was it reported? PF standards demand that it be in a peer-reviewed journal or something of equal validity. If it's merely on-line or in the back pages of Popular Science, it will justifiably be ignored.
     
  6. May 9, 2008 #5
    It's in wiki somewhere. It's not a regular report. It's from well known scientist. I'll try to find the link and post it up. However, of course it's been argue and justify as false alarm. I don't buy it though. Some "organization" may send out their scientists to "prove" it wrong. Of course majority of us is no match for their sophisticated knowledge.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-gravity
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2008
  7. May 9, 2008 #6

    Danger

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    Hmm.... since nobody knows how gravity works, it's a certainty that nobody knows how to counteract it.
     
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