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Any Metallurgists/ Material Scientists out there?

  1. Aug 5, 2008 #1
    Has anyone here worked as or studied materials science or metallurgy?
    Where did you end up?
    Any positive/negative aspects to the industry?

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated

    Cheers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 5, 2008 #2
    streeters,

    I'm a materials scientist who is pursuing his PhD, but I've also worked in industry for 3-years before deciding to go back to school. Materials Engineers, Materials Scientist, Metallurgists, or whatever are probably some of the most in demand people today. As soon as I graduated with my BS I didn't have trouble finding a job and I wasn't the best student at the time. Bottom line, if you like to operate high-energy equipment, get your hands dirty, and actually "make" something Materials Science is the field for you.

    modey3
     
  4. Aug 6, 2008 #3
    Thanks for the insight. Are you looking to get into academia with your PhD or just progressing your career? Did you feel limited without a PhD?
     
  5. Aug 6, 2008 #4
    I am studying both chemistry and physics. I am pondering the materials field from a computational physics-angle.

    modey3: what do you think about that? Is a computational physics/materials something that is in demand, if you got both the physics-part of QM and such, and the chemENG-angle on top of that?
     
  6. Aug 6, 2008 #5
    "modey3: what do you think about that? Is a computational physics/materials something that is in demand, if you got both the physics-part of QM and such, and the chemENG-angle on top of that?"

    Computational Materials Science (CMS), particularly in the ab-initio modeling (QM modeling) area, is a hot field of study. People who go into CMS or Materials Science for that matter come from all sorts of backgrounds: physics, chemistry, metallurgy/materials engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering. If CMS is interesting to you start learning about Density Functional Theory (DFT) because 90% of all the papers published in the area of CMS involve using DFT. CMS of course involves more than just DFT and the best applied theoreticians can model at all scales.

    modey3
     
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