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Anyone familiar with Richard Courant and Fritz John?

  1. Aug 25, 2006 #1
    Springer publishes a set of two volumes of classical textbooks, Introduction to Calculus and Analysys Volume 1 and Introduction to Calculus and Analysys Volume 2. I am currently using Volume 1 for self studying... whilst I do like theory better than solving problems I find the latter still essantial. In volume 1, no solution is provided to the numerous problems at the end of each chapter... I was wondering if anyone who is in the know could tell me if Volume 2 includes all the solutions. Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. Aug 26, 2006 #2

    Bystander

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    Solutions for 2.
     
  4. Aug 26, 2006 #3
    You mean volume 2 only has the solutions for the problems in it, excluding volume 1?
     
  5. Aug 26, 2006 #4

    Bystander

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    Yes. That's Wiley, Springer may have invested the time and money for vol. 1, but not likely.
     
  6. Aug 26, 2006 #5
    That's sad to learn... Volume 1 had some hard exercices.
     
  7. Aug 26, 2006 #6
    I'm almost certain volume 1 had solutions at the back. I could also be imagining things. :smile:
     
  8. Aug 27, 2006 #7
    you imagined it. (-:
     
  9. Aug 27, 2006 #8

    mathwonk

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    i taught out of vol 1 and never noticed whether any solutions were privded. try to get beyond looking in the back for answers, as it really does not help you learn.
     
  10. Jun 14, 2010 #9
    While copying proofs or procedures out of a solutions manual is a poor way to learn mathematics, it is, I believe, beneficial to have a set of answers to check your final result against. I too would like to have a solution manual for Courant.
     
  11. Jun 14, 2010 #10
    By the way, mathwonk, how would you compare the first volume "Introduction to Calculus and Analysis" (Courant and John) with "Calculus" (Spivak). Since you have taught out of the former (and I assume you are at least briefly familiar with Spivak), I would be interested in your analysis. Thanks!
     
  12. Jun 26, 2012 #11
    An accompanying solution manual for Volume I was prepared by Prof. Albert A. Blank back when the book was first published. Vol II saw the inclusion of these solutions. Needless to say, the book "Problems in Calculus and Analysis" by A.A. Blank, is in fact the original solution manual to Courant's Volume I. As to whether or not it is still in print, is an entirely different question.
     
  13. Jun 26, 2012 #12

    mathwonk

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    i have taught out of both courant and john, and spivak. spivak is more fun and in a sense easier to read, but i think you may learn more (in the sense of diversity) from courant and john if you try hard enough. however mike spivak is a friend of mine and a genius, and i myself first really felt i learned calculus by reading his book. he is a superb teacher. you cannot go wrong with any of these books, they are all terrific. it is like choosing between a bmw and a mercedes.

    this feels like a rude thing to say since it is probably wrong, but I still sort of want to say that if you feel the need of a solutions manulal for these books then you are not at the level these books were aimed at.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2012
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