Application of advanced spectrometer in geometrical optics?

In summary: This spectrometer is useful for looking at atomic and molecular spectra. A very nice experiment would be to examine the spectrum of a propane or butane flame. The blue color of the flame is primarily due to emission from electronically excited C2. The major structure in the spectrum is due to the quantization of vibration in the excited and ground electronic states.
  • #1
Dorea
28
1
We have an advanced spectrometer in our geometrical optics lab! I'm seeking for any experiment in geometrical optics to include it!
 
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  • #2
Dorea said:
We have an advanced spectrometer in our geometrical optics lab! I'm seeking for any experiment in geometrical optics to include it!
This spectrometer is useful for looking at atomic and molecular spectra. A very nice experiment would be to examine the spectrum of a propane or butane flame. The blue color of the flame is primarily due to emission from electronically excited C2. The major structure in the spectrum is due to the quantization of vibration in the excited and ground electronic states. c.f. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swan_band

You can also measure the spectra of discharge lamps. It is interesting to look at the difference between hydrogen and deuterium lamps -- assuming that you can get access to a discharge lamp power supply with H and D lamps. Google "spectrum tube power supply" and "spectrum tube" to see where to buy these/what these look like. The power supply is ca. $100, the tubes are ca. $20/ea.
 
  • #3
Thank you for answer.
There's many application for it in wave optics. More, I'm asking for experiment in geometrical optics field for freshmen!
 
  • #4
Dorea said:
Thank you for answer.
There's many application for it in wave optics. More, I'm asking for experiment in geometrical optics field for freshmen!

I see. The only thing that I can think of is to do some work measuring refractive indices of materials (Snell's Law). With a small set of laser pointers, you could measure the change in refractive index as a function of wavelength (dispersion curves) for some simple solid materials. If you have a "water prism" you could also measure this for some pure liquids.
 
  • #5
Dorea said:
We have an advanced spectrometer in our geometrical optics lab! I'm seeking for any experiment in geometrical optics to include it!

Strictly speaking, I don't see how this is possible- geometrical optics is wavelength independent, and chromatic aberrations are likely beyond what you are thinking.

I suppose you could do some version of Snell's law, Fresnel reflection/transmission coefficients, etc if you have a monochromatic light source. Maybe something with double refraction (uniaxial crystal optics). But all of these are ad-hoc excuses for using the instrument, as opposed to actually learning something.

Why did you guys decide to use this for a geometrical optics lab, as opposed to a wave optics lab?
 
  • #6
Quantum Defect said:
measuring refractive indices of materials (Snell's Law)

Instead of using Snell's Law directly, try using the minimum deviation angle of a prism. While watching a spectrum line through the viewing telescope, rotate the prism. You should be able to see the line move back and forth across your field of view, and locate the extreme angle in one direction.
 

1. What is a spectrometer and how does it work?

A spectrometer is an instrument used to measure the properties of light. It works by separating a beam of light into its component wavelengths and measuring the intensity of each wavelength. This allows for the analysis of the light source, such as its composition or the presence of certain elements.

2. How is a spectrometer used in geometrical optics?

In geometrical optics, a spectrometer can be used to measure the refractive index of a material or the angles of refraction and reflection of light. It can also be used to analyze the optical properties of lenses and other optical components.

3. What are the advantages of using an advanced spectrometer in geometrical optics?

An advanced spectrometer can provide more precise measurements and analysis compared to traditional methods. It can also be used to study a wider range of optical phenomena and can be more versatile in its applications.

4. How does an advanced spectrometer improve upon traditional spectrometers?

An advanced spectrometer may use more advanced technology and techniques such as Fourier transform spectroscopy or multi-channel detection, allowing for faster and more accurate measurements. It may also have a wider spectral range and higher resolution.

5. What are some practical applications of using an advanced spectrometer in geometrical optics?

An advanced spectrometer can be used in various fields such as material science, chemical analysis, and astronomy. It can also be used to improve the design and performance of optical devices, such as telescopes and cameras, by providing precise measurements of their optical properties.

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