Are phottons effected by gravity?

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In summary: It's more like light follows the path of least resistance and if there is a mass in the way it will be bent. So if there was a planet with a very high gravity it would cause all light to be stopped from escaping.
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Some days ago some body posted a question saying are photons effected by gravity but was unanswered straightly. Here is the answer: Yes they are. They will be completely be stopped if an escape velocity of a planet is greater than the speed of light.
 
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First off, its 'photon'. Secondly, light isn't so much "affected" by gravity as it just follows the path of least resistance through space just as any object would. So if gravity were strong enough to form a rather deep gravity well, then light would bend through the path like a marble encountering a dent in the floor it's rolled across. That's how gravitational lensing works. Starlight encounters the gravity well of a rather large mass (star) and follows the curvature of spacetime forming an image of a star blocked from view by the object. A black hole can form a large enough gravity well to pull light beyond the event horizon were it can't escape.
 
  • #3
really?

I was reading like: If at all a photons tries to escape a black hole in which the escape velocity is higher than the speed of light the photon will never be able to escape. Is that not true? ofcource a photon is bearly affected. Like i said i am telling an answer. What is 9.8 m/s compaered to 3.00*10^8?
 
  • #4
A black hole, by definition, is a body whose escape velocity is, at some altitude, greater than the speed of light. The mathematical surface surrounding such a body is called an 'event horizon.' On or inside this surface, the escape velocity exceeds c.

And the number 9.8 is not a velocity -- it's an acceleration -- m/s2. You cannot compare a velocity and an acceleration, because they mean different things.

- Warren
 
  • #5
Originally posted by anil
Some days ago some body posted a question saying are photons effected by gravity but was unanswered straightly. Here is the answer: Yes they are. They will be completely be stopped if an escape velocity of a planet is greater than the speed of light.

see this site answer


BTW.. "Secondly, light isn't so much "affected" by gravity" this is incorrect it is. see explanantion
ans2

good topic!
Dx :wink:
 
  • #6


Originally posted by Dx
see this site answer


BTW.. "Secondly, light isn't so much "affected" by gravity" this is incorrect it is. see explanantion
ans2

good topic!
Dx :wink:

Well I sort of ment not in the way that gravity affects objects with mass.
 

What are photons?

Photons are elementary particles that make up all forms of electromagnetic radiation, including light. They have zero mass, but carry energy and momentum.

Do photons have gravitational mass?

No, photons do not have gravitational mass. They have energy and momentum, but not mass. This means they do not experience the effects of gravity in the same way that massive particles do.

How are photons affected by gravity?

Although photons do not have mass, they are still affected by gravity. This is because they have energy and momentum, which can be influenced by gravitational forces. In fact, photons can be bent by the gravitational pull of massive objects, such as stars or black holes.

Do photons experience time dilation?

Time dilation is the phenomenon where time moves slower for objects moving at high speeds or in strong gravitational fields. Since photons travel at the speed of light and do not experience gravity in the same way as massive objects, they do not experience time dilation.

What is the relationship between photons and the curvature of spacetime?

Einstein's theory of general relativity states that massive objects can cause the curvature of spacetime. This means that photons can be affected by the curvature of spacetime caused by massive objects, such as planets or stars. This is why photons can be bent by the gravitational pull of these objects.

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