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Are you prepared for winter?

  1. Oct 20, 2008 #1

    turbo

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    The cold blasts of Arctic air we've gotten recently have got me winterizing. Yesterday, I drained and stored all my garden hoses and drained the pipes to the sill-cocks. Friday, I built a new wood-box that will hold at least 2 days' wood, kindling and other fire-starting materials. My wife wanted it to look rustic (we live in a log house), so I built it out of rough-sawn pine boards. We'll use it as-is over the winter and maybe paint it next summer.

    [​IMG]

    Lots of people have opted to buy stoves that burn either dry corn or wood pellets, and that is turning out to be problematic. The upward pressure on grain prices caused by burning corn means that corn is more expensive (now) than wood pellets, and the local stores are rationing wood pellets because they can't get enough to satisfy demand. Pellet stoves are convenient, but the price of the fuel can be manipulated, costing more money in the long run. I'm sticking with my conventional wood stove. If the economy continues to tank (especially locally), I know dozens of guys with chain saws and trucks who will gladly cut firewood to earn some cash.
     
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  3. Oct 20, 2008 #2

    wolram

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    Turbo, we are lucky? in England the temp only varies a few degrees between summer and winter, my little 1200 watt halogen heater is enough to keep me warm in most cases, other wise i just wear more clothes, the only draw back is taking a bath in the un heated bathroom,
    i dry real quick.

    Nice wood box, but rustic aint nails.
     
  4. Oct 20, 2008 #3

    turbo

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    They're square-headed nails. (Screws visible in the cleats inside, but I will putty those before painting.) I don't have the patience for joinery (dovetailing, etc).

    And yeah, you are pretty lucky to have such a moderate climate. Here, it generally ranges from 90 to 95 deg F (summer highs) to -20 deg F or colder (winter lows). When the first settlers came to New England, they were in for some nasty surprises.
     
  5. Oct 20, 2008 #4

    mgb_phys

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    And of course as a last resort you can always burn the box.
     
  6. Oct 20, 2008 #5

    wolram

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    Cruel :biggrin:
     
  7. Oct 20, 2008 #6

    turbo

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    :rofl::rofl: It would have to be a REALLY bad winter to make me do that. Here is my out-door wood-pile. I have twice as much firewood inside the woodshed.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Oct 20, 2008 #7
    I washed the dog, put fresh litter in the cats box. Yes, I am now ready for winter.
     
  9. Oct 20, 2008 #8

    turbo

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    I don't want to visit you when spring comes around. :devil:
     
  10. Oct 20, 2008 #9
    Changed some cars to winter tyres the other weekend and checked if the central heater still worked. Anything I forgot?
     
  11. Oct 20, 2008 #10

    turbo

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    I don't know. If your climate is as mild as Woolie's, you only need to check that you have an extra sweatshirt or two and maybe a fleece vest to wear on the REALLY cold days.
     
  12. Oct 20, 2008 #11
    I knit my dog a sweater. She developed a thyroid problem and has gotten too fat for her old one. I also found her little booties. Her poor feet freeze in the snow, and Ive seen her standing with one paw held in the air with a pained look on her face. I pulled out the horses blankets, but theyre not ready to wear them yet. We have turned the heat on here a couple times at night, but my apartment is in the basement so its colder indoors than out sometimes. My long johns are ready for me, but southern Ontario has yet to get cold
     
  13. Oct 20, 2008 #12
    Well, the severity range of the winters here is large. It could be equal to a cold summer but occasionally we may see snow and ice here. In that case The Netherlands gets the Elfstedentocht fever. I can proudly announce that the nephew of my grandfather won this prestigeous skating race in 1929.:tongue:

    But with both the sun and the Pacafic Decadal Oscilation in the cold phase, I'm checking if I still have mittens. Somewhere there must be a parka too.
     
  14. Oct 20, 2008 #13
    I grew up in Northern Utah and Nevada where we got tons of snow every winter, but without a doubt the coldest I've ever been is down here in Phoenix, AZ. I know it doesn't get nearly as cold here as it does up north, but I have frozen my butt off here. I don't know if it is because I've grown used to the daytime heat, or if I just don't bundle up as much or what. We have a pretty brutal temperature difference between night and day and even though our temperatures are shifted towards the top of the thermometer I have spent some miserable times late at night where I just couldn't stop shivering.
     
  15. Oct 20, 2008 #14
    I have stepped outside and had my breath taken away from the dead cold in the air. When we were little my brother and I would go sledding for hours, and we would come inside and our fingers would be blue and the skin on our cheeks would be raw (peeling within a few days) and there would be icicles hanging from our noses. We didnt care then, but you wouldnt catch me out there now
     
  16. Oct 20, 2008 #15

    turbo

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    In the '60's, I worked ski patrol for a ski area on a mountain near the Canadian border. It was often colder than 30 below when we got there in the morning, and we weren't allowed to ride the lift and pre-ski and inspect the trails until the temp got up to 20 below.

    Times have changed. In the '60's, my cousins and neighbors and I skated on Thanksgiving holiday, and we shoveled after school and on weekends to keep our ponds and bogs clear of snow so we could skate all through the Christmas break. Nowadays, it is almost impossible to find sound ice before the new year.
     
  17. Oct 20, 2008 #16
    My birthday is on thanksgiving and I always remember snow being involved. Now its sweater weather
     
  18. Oct 20, 2008 #17

    Borek

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    Wood is ready and I am already burning a log or two each day, but I have not changed tyres yet. To warm for that.
     
  19. Oct 20, 2008 #18

    turbo

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    I have to get my wife's tires changed over tomorrow. Possibility of snow Wednesday.

    I should start hoeing up my garlic beds for the winter planting, too, but we'll have to see how my arthritic knees are holding out tomorrow. They got a pretty good workout today, raking and tilling the manure into the garden, and they're kinda swell (not in a good way) tonight.
     
  20. Oct 20, 2008 #19
    I wish I had a fireplace :cry:
     
  21. Oct 20, 2008 #20

    turbo

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    Fireplaces are energy-wasters, Greg, because they are so hard to control. With a good little wood stove, you generally have control over draft, primary air, secondary air, etc. My wife and I had a fireplace in our last house, but it was built with a huge mass of masonry and the firebox was surrounded by a heat-o-later (air circulation around the hot firebox) so it was marginally efficient, but still nothing to compare to a nice wood-stove. (Unless you count lounging on the carpet with your loved one with a bottle of wine, a few snacks, and some good music on the stereo.) It was pretty good for that.
     
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