Arthur C. Clarke died

  • #26
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2001: A Space Odyssey for me was, and still is, his greatest achievement. But then again, I haven't really studied the man.
 
  • #27
JamesU
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That's too bad. IMO 2001 is one of the greatest of all-time.
 
  • #28
Evo
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Well, I rate Ray Bradbury higher than Heinlein, so for me, only two of the big three have passed away yet.
I loved Ray Bradbury, "A sound of thunder", "The Illustrated Man", "The Martian Chronicles". For me the top two were Bradbury and Asimov. Asimov's Dr Urth stories were what got me really hooked on science, Like "the Key". Also stories like "I'm in Marsport without Hilda", Marooned off Vesta", A Loint of Paw".

Here is one of my favorite Asimov stories, discussing tesseracts. It started my fascination with topography. http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/classics/classics_archive/heinlein/heinlein1.html

You don't like Asimov Arildno?
 
  • #29
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Are you sure that isn't a heinlein story Evo?
Heinlein was always my favorite of the three, until I read some of his final books. He turned into a real pervert.
 
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  • #30
arildno
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I loved Ray Bradbury, "A sound of thunder", "The Illustrated Man", "The Martian Chronicles". For me the top two were Bradbury and Asimov. Asimov's Dr Urth stories were what got me really hooked on science, Like "the Key". Also stories like "I'm in Marsport without Hilda", Marooned off Vesta", A Loint of Paw".

Here is one of my favorite Asimov stories, discussing tesseracts. It started my fascination with topography. http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/classics/classics_archive/heinlein/heinlein1.html

You don't like Asimov Arildno?
No, it was Heinlein I kicked out. To the "ignonimous" fourth place.
I like Asimov very well.
As I rate them, I'd say:
1. Arthur C. Clarke
2. Ray Bradbury
3. Isaac Asimov
4. R. Heinlein
 
  • #31
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Just thought I point out that an amazing coincidence has occurred after Clarke passed.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080321-distant-explosion.html

The burst was detected by Swift at 2:12 EDT on March 19 and was one of five gamma-ray bursts detected that day, the same day that famed science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke died.

"Coincidentally, the passing of Arthur C. Clarke seems to have set the universe ablaze with gamma-ray bursts," said Swift science team member Judith Racusin, a Penn State graduate student.
 
  • #32
DaveC426913
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  • #33
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  • #35
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  • #36
DaveC426913
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Tralfamadorians were celebrating Clarke's arrival.
Now we know how fast the soul travels.
7.5*10^9ly / 25h = 200,000,000ly / hour
 

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