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Atlantis and Hubble (viewed from earth)

  1. May 15, 2009 #1

    robphy

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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  4. May 15, 2009 #3

    Astronuc

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    :cool:
     
  5. May 15, 2009 #4
    How are these pictures taken? The sun isn't that big when viewed from the earth...? If you're focusing on the sun wouldn't the shuttle look huge? can someone explain this?
     
  6. May 15, 2009 #5
    Dear god, they are heading RIGHT FOR THE SUN!!
     
  7. May 15, 2009 #6

    RonL

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    Well! don't just set there, grab the wheel.:rofl:
     
  8. May 15, 2009 #7

    robphy

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    Did you follow the link in my post?
    It says
     
  9. May 15, 2009 #8

    russ_watters

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    robphy, the question was about magnification, not brightness.
    With a normal telescope, the Space Shuttle looks tiny - it is at an altitude of more than 500 km when servicing the hubble. Consider how an airplane looks at an altitude of 10 km - recognizable as an airplane, but only barely. The shuttle is only a few arcseconds across at that altitude, while the sun is 30 arcminutes (1800 arcseconds) across. Yes, the sun really does appear that much bigger than the space shuttle in orbit.
     
  10. May 15, 2009 #9

    Astronuc

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    The Shuttle and Hubble Space Telescope are at an altitude of approximately 350 miles (563 km), and the sun is about 93 million miles (149 million km) from the earth, and the sun has a diameter of 870,000 miles (1.4 million km). The Shuttle orbiter is only 122 ft (37 m) nose to tail.

    http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090515-sts125-sts125-solar-transit.html
     
  11. May 15, 2009 #10

    mgb_phys

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98hO97ky-sA
     
  12. May 15, 2009 #11

    drizzle

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    that pop up a question, you know the different photos of the galaxies like the milky way filled with billions of stars, are they real photos? If so how can such photos be taken, isn’t our solar system part of the milky way :confused:
     
  13. May 15, 2009 #12
    Great post!
     
  14. May 15, 2009 #13
    I'd love to see that one.
     
  15. May 15, 2009 #14

    russ_watters

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    Confused is right! The way you worded that doesn't make any sense in the context of the question. Photos of galaxies like the milky way are not photos of the milky way. There are hundreds of galaxies that are readily accessible to amateur astronomers and millions of them detectable by professionals.
     
  16. May 15, 2009 #15

    mgb_phys

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    Yes

    Whats the problem?
     
  17. May 15, 2009 #16

    russ_watters

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  18. May 15, 2009 #17
  19. May 15, 2009 #18
    More seriously though, is it not possible to reconstruct the image of the Milky Way as seen from outside ? We have enough data.
     
  20. May 15, 2009 #19

    russ_watters

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    Not really, since the disk obscures the disk. But here are some estimations: http://cass.ucsd.edu/public/tutorial/MW.html
    From the site:
     
  21. May 15, 2009 #20

    drizzle

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    I see, it's hard to get it. will, like = i.e. = for example, and I know there are hundreds of other galaxies other than the milky way

    the pro is how can this photo be taken?
     
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