Basic probability confusion with independence

  • Thread starter Jeff_McD18
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  • #1
Jeff_McD18
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Q. Consider the following statements about events A, B, and C.

- p(A) = 2/3
- p(B) = 1/2
- B c A
- Events A and C are independent
- Events B and C are mutually exclusive

Given that B is a subset of A is what is P(A n B). B is completely contained in A so any point in B is also in A which means that (A n B) = B which implies P(A n B) = P(B).

so therefor p(A|B) = 1/3

&

p(B|A)= 1/3

Is this correct?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
tiny-tim
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Welcome to PF!

Hi Jeff! Welcome to PF! :wink:
Given that B is a subset of A is what is P(A n B). B is completely contained in A so any point in B is also in A which means that (A n B) = B which implies P(A n B) = P(B).

Yes. :smile:
so therefor p(A|B) = 1/3

&

p(B|A)= 1/3

No.

p(A|B) is pronounced "the probability of A given B", and means the probability that something in B is also in A.
 
  • #3
Jeff_McD18
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okay, so p(A|B)=p(B)=1/3

How would you go about solving p(B|A)?
 
  • #4
tiny-tim
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okay, so p(A|B)=p(B)=1/3

No.

Don't you know a formula for P(A|B) ?
 
  • #5
Jeff_McD18
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P(A|B) = p(A n B)/p(B)
 
  • #6
tiny-tim
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Aha! :smile:

ok … so applying it, P(A|B) = … ? :wink:
 

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