Beauty of old electrical and measuring things, etc.

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OmCheeto

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DSL modem just went on the blink. stop
Currently communicating via free Wi-Fi. stop
Was at the local Science museum on Wednesday, when I heard Morse code. stop
Still haven't learned Morse code. stop
Drats! stop

Modem is in the freezer. stop
Heard that fixes these new fangled machines. stop

Can't remember why people always ended sentences with "stop". stop

Argh!
 

dlgoff

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Still haven't learned Morse code.
I've got just what you need.
codecourse.png

And if you don't have a way to play it, I may be able to help there too.

Once you've learned the code, you'll need one of these.
codekey.png
 

dlgoff

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Some old test equipment pieces can never look a good as they did in their youth, like this 1941 Philco 050 Tube Tester. It was stored for years in dampness and all I could do for the front panel was to seal in what was still there with a clear spray. I repainted the enclosure, replaced the felt on the feet, and spliced in the middle section of the carry strap (splice is under strap brackets). But most of the time was spent on the inside coating every wire's insulation with clear fingernail polish to seal crack and prevent shorts.

The real beauty in this case is the thing works. Now I'll be able to go through all my old tubes and annotate their quality on some new tube boxes.

Philco 050_1.jpg


Philco 050_2.jpg


Philco 050_3.jpg
 

Borg

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I remember in the early 70's taking tubes to a local TV repair shop whenever our TV stopped working properly. I would take all of the tubes to the shop, find the bad one and have the TV working again pretty quickly. My mother thought I was some kind of miracle worker. :oldtongue:
 

dlgoff

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I remember in the early 70's taking tubes to a local TV repair shop ...
I did the same thing but at a gasoline filling station.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tube_tester:

From the late 1920s until the late 1960s, many drug stores and grocery stores in the U.S. had a self-service tube-vending display. It typically consisted of a tube-tester atop a locked cabinet of tubes, with a flip chart of instructions.
450px-RCA-tube-tester-at-Oklahoma-History-Center.jpg
 

dlgoff

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I added a little Sodium to the gas-discharge lamps. The one on the right is a low-pressure lamp and the one on the left is a high-pressure lamp. Both are rated at 35 Watts. The first pic was take at turn-on and the second pic was taken after they warmed up.

Sodium_begin.jpg


Sodium_end.jpg
 

dlgoff

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Here's a couple of items I picked up at an antique store. The Narco VHT-3 is going to be a fun one as I'm hoping to be able to demonstrate the VOR (very high frequency omnidirectional radio range) receiver by watching the course deviation indicator (CDI) change when reorienting the omnidirectional antenna I'm building.

morestuff.jpg
 

davenn

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hey Don,

real cool ... some great new additions there :smile:

Dave
 

Borg

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Did some late spring cleaning on a room where I store misc. stuff. I could have created a thread called the "Beauty of old coffee makers". :olduhh:
 

dlgoff

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I could have created a thread called the "Beauty of old coffee makers". :olduhh:
If they have wires, post some pics. Preferably really old ones.
 

Borg

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If they have wires, post some pics. Preferably really old ones.
I tossed them out. The thread would have honestly had to have been called "Crappy old coffee makers" or "Stuff for the garbage heap". I wouldn't think of sullying your thread with such trash. :oldtongue:
 
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dlgoff

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It's good to have, as ZapperZ calls them, enablers. One of my "enablers" was talking to one of his neighbors, who's in the construction business, about my collection and the neighbor said he had found something in this old house that I may want and gave it to him to pass along to me. May want? Hello! What a great find!

Triplett 360-A.jpg


Original leads, leather case (removed for display), and instruction manual. The ohms scales require a 1.5V and a 30V battery. The 1.5V battery leaked a little on the 30V one which is still alive at 27V. I'm so thrilled to have this Beauty.
 

jim hardy

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That pristine Triplett is just wonderful !

I series-ed three nines for mine (bought new in 1964).
 

dlgoff

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That pristine Triplett is just wonderful !

I series-ed three nines for mine (bought new in 1964).
I couldn't believe how good the condition was. I tried checking the space needed to use three modern nine volt ones but I just couldn't bring myself having them out side of the meter's designed battery compartment. Besides, for Ω measurements, the 1.5 volt battery is used on all but the X100 000 scale. If I ever wanted to use that scale, I'd have to bite the bullet and purchase the Eveready 413 or NEDA 210 replacement by Exell. But I think I'll just look at the meter instead. :olduhh:
 

Averagesupernova

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I have a meter like that Triplett but have never had a set of leads for it.
 

dlgoff

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I have a meter like that Triplett but have never had a set of leads for it.
You know. These test leads may not be original after all. When I saw the "1200V MAX." molded into the red and black prob ends, I just assumed they were originals. Now I'm thinking they may be replacements. Sorry about that. You know what they say about "assume"? :redface:
 

dlgoff

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It's been a while since updating with some more beauty. I've been working on several goodies so I'll just show a snapshot of the display for now. The Nav radio is the one I've been clearing the bench for.

the display

beautydisplay.jpg


To get the Nav radio working required an antenna, so I had to build one like the ones used with it back in the day. They called it a "cat wisker whisker" directional dipole similar to this one on the tail of a Cessna 172. (image compliments of http://www.weekendcfii.com/)

C172_tail_top.jpg


Since Greg and berkeman has made it possible to share my stuff, I'm dedicating the one I built to them and Physics Forums. Thanks Greg and Mike.

small1092.jpg

small1105.jpg

It is rotatable and uses a sleeve balum like this. (image compliments of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dipole_antenna)

150px-Dipolesleevebalun.png

The radio was originally powered by a 12 volt lead-acid battery and required 10 amps (receiver plus transmitter) so I found a nice 11 amp supply to use. This is a work in progress; first getting the thing to power up (had to open the power supply's vibrator to clean contacts and realign). Here's a pic of the progress so far.

navwork.jpg


Edit: Here's a couple of pictures of the "cat whisker" antenna mounted.

catwisker1.jpg

catwisker2.jpg
 
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jim hardy

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My local scrap metal yard sees an amazing array of gizmos.
For some months i watched what i assumed to be high voltage power line bushing, thinking if the insulator rings weren't broken it'd make a nice mounting base for a birdbath or sundial.
Well, one day the owner (Calvin) cut it in two with his giant diesel powered pincer. It was full of strange looking things so out of curiosity i brought home some of the parts. At thirty cents a pound one can indulge his curiosity.

Anybody who's been around switchyards has heard of a "Capacitive Coupled Potential Device".
It looks like a transformer bushing
ccpd1.jpg


but it actually houses a voltage reducing circuit that allows one to measure those hundreds of kilovolts with ordinary meters.

upload_2015-9-3_6-17-4.png


The series capacitor string inside the bushing divides the high voltage down to something manageable at the tap, perhaps 20kv which one can further reduce to 120VAC with an ordinary transformer and read with everyday meters.

Here's what it looked like when i got it home.


ccpd1 001.jpg


Who could resist taking that apart ? Looks like a trove of Tesla coil parts !

Each deck is a pair of small capacitors in parallel-series, the little green buttons
ccpd3003.jpg


and judging by the glass insulators, they're high voltage parts. Their part number is cryptic so i've emailed an inquiry to Sprague.....

The blue&gray stacked cylinders are connected in parallel with the capacitors, as are the smaller black cylinders. What on earth were they for?
Ancient and barely readable instruction leaflets suggested there'd be a spark gap to protect against overvoltage
http://www.electricalpartmanuals.com/pdf/transformer/Westinghouse/Arresters and Capacitors/DB39631.pdf
gap.JPG


and if you're going to strike an arc around power equipment you'd darn well better provide something to limit the fault current !

Sure enough,
the grey cylinder turns out to be a 2 kohm resistor, presumably to limit current to <around 100 amps ?


ccpd 010_smallr.jpg

that thing would absorb tremendous wattage for the milliseconds it takes to clear a fault

and the blue cylinder indeed turned out to be a stack of spark gaps,
note the copper horns, so carefully spaced with a plastic separator piece
ccpd 012smallr.jpg


The coil around the center layer of spark gap i figure is to help extinguish the arc.
ccpd 016smallr.jpg

it's wound in direction that its MMF by right hand rule pushes the arc toward the center, where the horns diverge.
That makes the arc longer and surrounds it with ceramic to help absorb heat and extinguish the arc. The gray cylindrical resistor takes the brunt of a fault, limiting the current to a value that won't blow up this blue arc arrestor.
Basic Physics Rules !
This one showed minor burn marks and there was one charred wire nearby, probably the reason this CCPD was in the junkyard. It didn't blow up , though !

The black cylinders are in parallel too, and i believe them to be high megohm bleeder resistors to prevent DC buildup on the capacitors. I don't have an ohmmeter that'll measure them. They're hard ceramic, probably silicon carbide. They need to be tall to keep the kilovolts per inch within reason.

ccpd 005smaller.jpg


So - i had an afternoon's entertainment for just a few bucks.
Had i known it was CCPD i'd have brought it home before Calvin crushed it. I believe a fellow's heirs should scratch their heads in wonderment at the estate sale.

I mailed a couple parts to dlgoff for his museum, put some in my high voltage pile. I have ten pounds of #30 magnet wire for a Tesla coil....These high voltage caps might be handy for that, amateur Tesla enthusiasts make their own out of window glass.
Maybe Don will post a pic of the neat 10KV capacitor.

So - while this was hardly a beautiful piece of equipment, i'd say the thought that went into it has beauty.



old jim
 
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We called them CVTs - never saw the inside( well at least intact) - ABB CVT
The parallel resistors have two functions - they "balance" the caps - helping the Voltage divider stay uniform and distribte the V stress in sync with the waveform. But also provide a discharge path for the energy, as well as over voltages. With one of these (assembled and in good health)- just a (dry) wind blowing on the HV bus can induce a static charge.
 

dlgoff

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I mailed a couple parts to dlgoff for his museum, ...
You should have seen my eyes light up when I took the first glimpse on opening the package. Some may have considered it junk but there's a lot of beauty there. It was kind of like a puzzle in that you packaged it with the bleeder resistor connection plate on the blue spark gap stack instead of the 2kΩ current limiting resistor. Luckily there was just enough corrosion that I figured that part out. Here is how I thought it went together.

CCPD-1.jpg


I'm glad you posted those solution pictures. :oldbiggrin:

Maybe Don will post a pic of the neat 10KV capacitor.
It about floored me when I saw the voltage rating of that cap. :oldsurprised: Here's a good pic of it.

10kVcap.jpg
 

dlgoff

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Life's little problems keep getting in the way of my beauty stuff. So while I've got some time before the next problem I'm able to show a couple beauties. I purchased an old Heathkit IB-1103 frequency counter that wasn't working for cheap. Whoever had put this thing together could have use some soldering training. After re-soldering half of the components and clearing bridges from the other half, I finally got it to count. What I like about the looks of this useful piece of test equipment are the Nixie tubes. I also got the NARCO VHT-3 Super Homer navigation radio all working. I mounted both in the wall under the HP 651A Test Oscillator.

heathfreq.jpg


The hardest part of the NARCO Nav Radio project was building Greg's omni-receiving horizontal V-type antenna. Here's the radio receiving the Butler VOR signal at 115.90 MHz with a bearing set by the course selector directly to the station (To get this bearing, I used Google Earth to get the latitude and longitude of the receiving antenna. The Butler station coordinates are a given.)

bearingto.jpg


With the bearing set for a heading left of Butler,

bearingleft.jpg


With the bearing set for a heading right of Butler,

bearingright.jpg


This one, thanks to berkeman's advice on transmitter dummy loads etc, shows the transmitter working by the lit indication lamp when keyed. (It only get lit by coupling RF energy from a coil in the output section, making it a reliable indicator.)

keyed.jpg


This one shows the Bird dummy load and power supply behind the wall.

dummy.jpg
 

Averagesupernova

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Whoever had put this thing together could have use some soldering training. After re-soldering half of the components and clearing bridges from the other half, I finally got it to count.
I have found this to be the case with many many Heathkits.
 
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I don't frequent the EE forum page so I had missed this thread. Wow you guys have some cool stuff! ...dlgoff, you do beautiful work, AND you have a drill press on your kitchen counter. What a hero! You made my day...
 

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