Beauty of old electrical and measuring things, etc.

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Bobbywhy

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Don,

Well done! Your collection is worthy of a first-class museum rating: Not only does it appear to be in physically in great condition, but evidently much of it functions! Not to mention the superb artistic aspect you've captured. Wish I could see all your collection up close in person.

Cheers, Bobbywhy
 
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Thanks for posting the photos.

The antique pearl push-button light switches evoked some nostalgia for me, we had these in the home I grew up in, something I had completely forgotten until I saw your photo.
 

dlgoff

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My first ever electronic camera picture .

IMG_2584_zps928d0965.jpg


"Look ma,no film ! "

Now to learn menu driven focus and exposure .

grumble grumble grumble...

old jim
Awesome. Love them dials.

Forget the menu. I use automatic mode. :biggrin:

Don,

Well done! Your collection is worthy of a first-class museum rating: Not only does it appear to be in physically in great condition, but evidently much of it functions! Not to mention the superb artistic aspect you've captured. Wish I could see all your collection up close in person.

Cheers, Bobbywhy
Thanks. It's a "work in progress" as I find new devices. I'll post some new pics soon.

Thanks for posting the photos.

The antique pearl push-button light switches evoked some nostalgia for me, we had these in the home I grew up in, something I had completely forgotten until I saw your photo.
That was one of the main reasons for starting this thread. And for the younger members who have never seen stuff like this.
 

dlgoff

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This ceramic beauty is so fresh that I haven't done any research on it yet. It was covered with paint and dirt when I got it. I soaked it in hot water with a little dish soap. The paint came off fairly easily from the abrasion of my finger tips. When taking it apart, I was surprised that even the switch knob was made from ceramic.

udQTp5K.jpg
 
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dlgoff

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Here's a real beauty I found stashed in a crawlspace buried in dirt. I finally cleaned it up and what a surprise.

CZTKN7a.jpg


ljrai45.jpg


xz124C5.jpg
 

dlgoff

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This Western Electric telephone lightning protector (note the fuses and carbon block arrestor) was given to me by a very close friend. It's very special to me because of my admiration for him. He's been fighting brain cancer and all the emotional stuff associated with it.

So this one is for you David.

gQFJz4P.jpg
 

dlgoff

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Cool :)

That could be a new cyberpunk genre - electric punk.
With this in mind, I decided to add a little "pop" to my always evolving project.
I added some chemicals (glitter) and a flame on the 7.5 kV "distilling light" thing.

B64OErO.jpg


I added porcelain fixtures and used them to display different filament configurations.

H9NLXDy.jpg


And why just a little arc from the 9.0 kV, so this

48cd97F.jpg


And here's a little something for Greg. :D
ALDKlD9.jpg

There's a lot of stuff that I've refurbished and is just waiting to be used.

KUBUzbI.jpg
 
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dlgoff

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Haha, this monster light bulb looks mean. How much power it can safely handle?
It's a 1000 watt bulb that I'm running off a 24 volt transformer. I don't think my wiring could handle the full load. Besides, at full load, you'd be blinded and couldn't see other filaments. :cool:
 

dlgoff

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I decided to put together something "useful" from old parts that shows it's beauty. I made a regulated d.c. power supply using vacuum tubes. It uses a old transformer that was integrated with a full-wave rectifier tube socket. I had never seen one like this before and my research came up empty. After opening and making some voltage checks, I figured the rectifier must have been a 5Y3. So I cleaned it up (painted outside and varnished some cracked leads), put in a 5Y3 rectifier and tested; it worked okay. Then decided to make use of two cold cathode gas glow regulator tubes (0A3 & 0B3) that determined my output voltages. The 0A3 was designed for 75 volt regulation and the 0B3 was designed for 90 volt regulation. By using an old two pole, 3 position rotor switch, I would then be able to get an output of 75V from the 0A3, 90V from the 0B3, and 165V from putting them in series.

Here are some pictures of the results:

m9MQBSG.jpg


Zp2Iqv4.jpg


Output with regulator A (75 volt 0A3):

bZ2UMob.jpg


Output with regulator B (90 volt 0B3):

ajOif1m.jpg


Output with regulator A and B in series (165 volt 0A3 + 0B3):

9he6eO8.jpg


Here's the supply showing it's beauty when the room is darker:

gmO7kGl.jpg
 

dlgoff

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... decided to make use of two cold cathode gas glow regulator tubes (0A3 & 0B3) that determined my output voltages. The 0A3 was designed for 75 volt regulation and the 0B3 was designed for 90 volt regulation.
When determining the regulator tube's current limiting resistor value, I under estimated the filtered rectified voltage (filter consisted of a 10 H choke and two 47 μF caps). So I had to up the value of the current limiter and use a 0D3 (designed for 150 volt regulation) in place of the 0B3. So now the output voltages are 75V, 150V, and 225V; nice 75V steps. Here's the thing showing it's beauty after the changes.

JLp8NFJ.jpg
 

Bystander

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Are you operating a "rescue shelter" for old dinosaur parts? I've odds and ends that may eventually need to be placed in a "good home."
 

dlgoff

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Are you operating a "rescue shelter" for old dinosaur parts? I've odds and ends that may eventually need to be placed in a "good home."
I probably won't live long enough to rescue all my old parts. We're going to need a joint effort here. Show me some of your "old parts beauty". :biggrin:
 

Bystander

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Be a day or two to get them all powdered and rouged for the camera.
 

dlgoff

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Awesome Bystander. Take your time and enjoy the beauty.
 

Bystander

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IMGP0411.JPG
 

anorlunda

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Kudos dlgoff, very well done. What you did would make a wonderful display in a museum. Makes me feel really vintage though because almost all that stuff was ordinary everyday stuff to me sometime in the past.

I think kids could learn easier from displays of working things that are made so wonderfully visual as you did. Much better than static objects coupled with plastic murals with written narratives seen in most modern museums.

It would be wonderful if you can arrange for your work to be preserved and displayed to the public sometime in the future.

On a practical note, of all the things you showed, Bakelite I think is the one thing most difficult to preserve. Perhaps you can couple up with someone who has a 3D printer to make a replica before the Bakelite crumbles.
 

dlgoff

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Kudos dlgoff, very well done. ... I think kids could learn easier from displays of working things that are made so wonderfully visual as you did.
Thank You. I'm hoping there are some kids that may see how it was done back in the "old days".
 
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Regarding transformer with integrated rectifier:

There was a television manufacturer that used these. It was so long ago as to be in the murk, but I seem to recall the tube being a 5U4.

Some of those old televisions had crazy construction. I recall ones with ferro-resonate regulators...
 

dlgoff

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There was a television manufacturer that used these. It was so long ago as to be in the murk, but I seem to recall the tube being a 5U4.
You could be right. I was a kid when I got the old thing and though I remembered getting it from an old radio. I haven't been able to find anything on the web. If you're correct, I'll have to change the rectifier tube to the 5U4. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.
 

jim hardy

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There was a television manufacturer that used these. It was so long ago as to be in the murk, but I seem to recall the tube being a 5U4.
I can remember having one of those in high school. At that time i was scrounging parts to build a 50 watt stereo amplifier (6BQ5's).
Indeed it came from a television; that's where we got parts in early sixties... a local dump sold scrap TV chassis for 50 cents.
Even though it was just the right voltage I used a different transformer solely because that one was so ugly.
I used that stereo for around twelve years replacing it with Harmon Kardon solid state in mid '70's. Dad used it in his garage for another decade.
Ahhh nostalgia.

5U4 and 5Y3 have same pinout, former is somewhat more robust.
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5y3gt.pdf
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5u4gb.pdf

old jim
 

dlgoff

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I can remember having one of those in high school. At that time i was scrounging parts to build a 50 watt stereo amplifier (6BQ5's).
Indeed it came from a television; that's where we got parts in early sixties... a local dump sold scrap TV chassis for 50 cents.
Even though it was just the right voltage I used a different transformer solely because that one was so ugly.
I used that stereo for around twelve years replacing it with Harmon Kardon solid state in mid '70's. Dad used it in his garage for another decade.
Ahhh nostalgia.

5U4 and 5Y3 have same pinout, former is somewhat more robust.
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5y3gt.pdf
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5u4gb.pdf

old jim
I consider first hand information like this to be like peer review information. I'm going to change it to the 5U4. Thank you. :)

Here's a future beauty I'll be working on but it's what's on top that's very special to me.

qVpCb7y.jpg

M4Vzl7r.jpg

WuWQAej.jpg


It was a gift from a good friend and I used it to look up the base diagrams for the tubes in order to verify they were indeed interchangeable. ;)
 

davenn

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I can remember having one of those in high school. At that time i was scrounging parts to build a 50 watt stereo amplifier (6BQ5's).
Indeed it came from a television; that's where we got parts in early sixties... a local dump sold scrap TV chassis for 50 cents.
Even though it was just the right voltage I used a different transformer solely because that one was so ugly.
I used that stereo for around twelve years replacing it with Harmon Kardon solid state in mid '70's. Dad used it in his garage for another decade.
Ahhh nostalgia.

5U4 and 5Y3 have same pinout, former is somewhat more robust.
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5y3gt.pdf
http://www.r-type.org/pdfs/5u4gb.pdf

old jim
you're showing your age there, jimmy, me lud ;) haha

I really miss all the old tube radio restoration I used to do back in New Zealand

Hey Don
1954 on that ARRL manual .... not too many yrs before I was born ;)

Dave
 

jim hardy

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you're showing your age there, jimmy, me lud ;) haha
It's kinda fun becoming antique. Grandson is fascinated by his new Christmas slide rule..
 

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