Beauty of old electrical and measuring things, etc.

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dlgoff

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I don't frequent the EE forum page so I had missed this thread. Wow you guys have some cool stuff! ...dlgoff, you do beautiful work, AND you have a drill press on your kitchen counter. What a hero! You made my day...
Thank you. You're exactly part of the reason for this thread.
 

dlgoff

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Here's a nice addition to my old NARCO avionics. It's a Mark 12B transceiver with a Navigation channel section and with a NARCO power module. I've got it working now and planing to mount in the wall below the Nav Receiver.
Mark 12B.jpg


This is what the display looks like now with a few items fired up.
display 12-18-15.jpg
 

anorlunda

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Man that looks like fun. Thanks again for sharing.

I'll bet that stuff heats up the room if you turn it all on.
 

dlgoff

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I can't wait to fire up this beauty. Don't worry; safety first.

X-raytube_small.jpg
 

dlgoff

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Just think of all the skills required to build that thing.
Indeed. I was very thrilled that it arrived in one piece. I'm still in the process of determining it's authenticity but it does appear to be a Victor Electric Company tube.


[PLAIN]http://www.gendex.com/history said:
Only[/PLAIN] [Broken] a few years after Roentgen’s 1895 discovery, Victor Electric Company of Chicago, started manufacturing X-ray equipment for the medical and dental community and offered these products through its subsidiary, Victor X-ray Corporation.
 
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jim hardy

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I'm still in the process of determining it's authenticity but it does appear to be a Victor Electric Company tube.
i was going to say - there's similar looking contraptions in the Philo Farnsworth museum in Rigby Idaho... Farnsworth was a vacuum tube designer of some note.
His "Fusor" is a desktop fusion device using electric field confinement but it doesn't break even just makes neutrons. Makes sense an accomplished vacuum tube guy would be drawn to electric field approach....

I'll keep my eyes peeled for one for ya !
 

dlgoff

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i was going to say - there's similar looking contraptions in the Philo Farnsworth museum in Rigby Idaho... Farnsworth was a vacuum tube designer of some note.
His "Fusor" is a desktop fusion device using electric field confinement but it doesn't break even just makes neutrons. Makes sense an accomplished vacuum tube guy would be drawn to electric field approach....

I'll keep my eyes peeled for one for ya !
You're awesome Jim.
The tube does appear to be like this one from http://www.electrotherapymuseum.com/2004/VictorXRayTube/index.htm
Victor1.jpg

They have their company's name etched in the glass around the anode. There's something there on mine (very difficult to see) but I need to get a good picture of it
 

Borg

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I can't wait to fire up this beauty. Don't worry; safety first.
I didn't read closely enough the first time to realize that you now have an old X-ray tube. I hope that you have good detectors and lead shields for when you fire up that puppy. :wideeyed:
 

dlgoff

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I didn't read closely enough the first time to realize that you now have an old X-ray tube. I hope that you have good detectors and lead shields for when you fire up that puppy. :wideeyed:
Oh yea. I've got the stuff. :approve:
 

dlgoff

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I hope that you have good detectors ...
I'm thinking this should be okay.

X-ray_detector.jpg


edit: which is a beauty on it's own. :)
 

jim hardy

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Wow . And i thought i had a collection of weird stuff.

i do have a BF3 neutron detector tube in case you get into cold fusion....... no preamp or readout though.
 

dlgoff

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i do have a BF3 neutron detector tube in case you get into cold fusion.......
We should get together and built a reaction chamber. :olduhh:
I bet @mfb would be willing to help. :oldwink:
 

dlgoff

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I've been really busy lately and have some catching up to do. I added a black shadow box to the meter and gauge display. Could be the last one (?).
wall M&Gs.jpg


Soon I'll be posting some photos of the vintage (1902 - 1925 Victor) X-ray tube project.
 
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I guess I am really telling my age but I have actually used the Narco VOR and the radio in a real airplane.

Very cool collection of stuff. I may have an old open cockpit biplane head set to add to your collection. I will see if I can dig it up.

And for all you guys that think morse code is long dead and gone we still use it to identify the VOR today!! It is going away but it will be around for a while.

By 2000 there were about 3,000 VOR stations around the world including 1,033 in the US, reduced to 967 by 2013[3] with more stations being decommissioned with the widespread adoption of GPS.

Cheers,

Billy
 

dlgoff

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Very cool collection of stuff.
Thank you.
I may have an old open cockpit biplane head set to add to your collection. I will see if I can dig it up.
Now that would be a great supplement for the Narco radios. Thanks.
And for all you guys that think morse code is long dead and gone we still use it to identify the VOR today!!
... radio receiving the Butler VOR signal at 115.90 MHz ...
Even though the Butler station is ~100 miles away, I can clearly hear their Morse ID (- ... ..- --).
By 2000 there were about 3,000 VOR stations around the world including 1,033 in the US, reduced to 967 by 2013[3] with more stations being decommissioned with the widespread adoption of GPS.
Wow. Very interesting. Thanks for sharing the PDF reference.
 

jim hardy

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We should get together and built a reaction chamber. :olduhh:
I bet @mfb would be willing to help. :oldwink:
I'd love to do that
right now i know i'd be over-committing

i do have a pretty good vacuum pump
and that BF3 chamber
and a neon sign transformer.....
 

dlgoff

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i do have a pretty good vacuum pump
Cool. Do you have a photo you could share?

I cleaned up mine so that I can get back to an aluminum vacuum disposition project that I put on hold some 30+ years ago. Couldn't believe the cost of vacuum grease now days. Buying online including shipping, nearly $50 for 5.3oz.
79751_30%20OL.jpg

I'll be posting pictures of it when I start depositing aluminum on glass microscope slides.
 

dlgoff

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I can't wait to fire up this beauty. Don't worry; safety first.
I made a 25 kV power source from an old color TV to supply the old X-ray tube. But even though the radiation from it is considered low LET (linear energy transfer), there is still danger from absorbed doses. My survey meter measures absorbed dose in mrads/hr. The biological risk from radiation exposure (or equivalent dose), measured in rems, is determined by LET giving a radiation weighing factor; in this case the factor is equal to one. Note that 100 rem would make you sick.

I measured 1 mrad/hr at ~10 feet from the front of the display (or 1 rem/hr) and 150 mrad/hr at the center of the tube’s output (or 150 rem/hr). So don’t try this at home kids.

For safety reasons, I incorporated a key locking power switch (with a big red indicator) and a 25 kV on/off push-button switch at the end of a long cable to get some distance from the tube when in operation. I also made sure there was a Danger and a Warning sign visible.

Here are two photos; one up close un-energized and one at a distance energized.
x-ray off.jpg


x-ray on.jpg
 
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berkeman

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Pretty amazing work, Don. I'm glad you took safety aspects into consideration. :smile:
 

dlgoff

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I'm glad you took safety aspects into consideration. :smile:
Safety should always enter the equation. Knowing that you feel the same, maybe a sticky for dangers and safety in engineering would be appropriate. We haven't lived this long for not respecting electricity. I'm sure others would have great advice.
 

berkeman

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Safety should always enter the equation. Knowing that you feel the same, maybe a sticky for dangers and safety in engineering would be appropriate. We haven't lived this long for not respecting electricity. I'm sure others would have great advice.
Interesting idea. That might make a good EE forum stickie thread. Let me think on it a bit... :smile:
 
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"Don't kill yourself having fun"

I try my best to remember that, on the ocean, in the air, and pokin round in the high voltage!!

0qYPsXd.jpg


Cheers,

Billy
 

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