Behavior of e constant in exponents

  • Thread starter mathor345
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  • #1
mathor345
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Homework Statement



differentiate

[tex]y = t^{5-e}[/tex]

Homework Equations



Power rule

The Attempt at a Solution



[tex]u = (5 - e)[/tex]

[tex](u)t^{u - 1}[/tex]

= [tex](5 - e)t^{4-e}[/tex]

Is this a correct usage? I'm not sure if there are any equations regarding this, but since e is a constant this should be correct right?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
SammyS
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Yes. That's correct for u being a constant.
 
  • #3
Char. Limit
Gold Member
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22

Homework Statement



differentiate

[tex]y = t^{5-e}[/tex]

Homework Equations



Power rule

The Attempt at a Solution



[tex]u = (5 - e)[/tex]

[tex](u)t^{u - 1}[/tex]

= [tex](5 - e)t^{4-e}[/tex]

Is this a correct usage? I'm not sure if there are any equations regarding this, but since e is a constant this should be correct right?

Yeah, that'll work.
 
  • #4
mathor345
16
0
Thank you.
 
  • #5
36,311
8,281

Homework Statement



differentiate

[tex]y = t^{5-e}[/tex]

Homework Equations



Power rule

The Attempt at a Solution



[tex]u = (5 - e)[/tex]

[tex](u)t^{u - 1}[/tex]

= [tex](5 - e)t^{4-e}[/tex]

Is this a correct usage? I'm not sure if there are any equations regarding this, but since e is a constant this should be correct right?
The mechanics are all right, but you haven't made it clear what you're doing, which is finding dy/dt. Your notation isn't helpful at all, with u mixed in with y and t.

This is how I would do it:

y = t5 - e
==> dy/dt = (5 - e)t5 - e - 1 = (5 - e)t4 - e
 

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