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Classical Best Textbook for thermodynamics and statistical mechanics

  1. Mar 29, 2016 #1

    grandpa2390

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    Gold Member

    ok so I am in this class... but my professor is not very helpful. I'm not really caring for the assigned textbook, I want to try a different one. One of the issues is that my professor just threw the textbook away and is doing his own thing, so it is difficult to try and study from the textbook. But maybe a different textbook can help me before I plague the site with dumb questions :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 29, 2016 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Which is...? (Just so people here don't waste time recommending it to you. :oldwink:)
     
  4. Mar 29, 2016 #3

    grandpa2390

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    You're right, I'm sorry. I thought about that, but I didn't put down the title for some reason. it is Thermal Physics by Schroeder
     
  5. Mar 31, 2016 #4

    vanhees71

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    2016 Award

    Callen, H. B.: Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics, 2 edition, John Wiley&Sons, 1985
     
  6. Mar 31, 2016 #5

    Dr Transport

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    Start with the Berkeley Series: Statistical Physics by Reif, then go on to Thermal and Statistical Physics by Reif. Throw in Thermal Physics by Kittel and Kroemer and you'll know plenty....
     
  7. Mar 31, 2016 #6

    grandpa2390

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    Thanks guys and gals (don't want to offend, forum doesn't tell me genders)

    I'm at maxwell relations in class and need all the reading, and cross-referencing I can get ;)

    applying the relations themselves is simple enough. but the problems my professor is expecting us to solve...

    before asking questions I like to try and figure it out on my own. If I take a week to solve a problem and do it on my own. I won't forget the solution too quickly lol.
     
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