Bohr's model electron transition paths

In summary, the conversation discusses the paths electrons can take when transitioning between stationary orbits and how to determine the wavelengths of emitted photons. It is mentioned that an electron can go between any two orbital values and that the energy required to go from one orbital to another remains the same. The number of photons emitted depends on the transitions between orbits, but generally only one transition is considered at a time. The formula for determining the energy of an electron at a certain orbital and the energy of a photon with a given wavelength is also mentioned. It is clarified that going from a higher energy orbital to a lower energy orbital will emit a photon. However, it is possible for an electron to emit two photons during a longer transition.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



I'm trying to figure out what paths the electrons take when transitioning between stationary orbits.
For example if there are 4 orbits: n1, n2, n3, n4; How do I know if the electron goes from n4 ---> n1 or
n4--->n3 ---->n2 -----> n1 ?
I was asked to calculate the wavelengths of emitted photons. But is there only 1 such wavelength? 4? how many?
 
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  • #2
hi, try using the little x2 button in the post response

basically, an electron can go between any two orbital values

it can go from n1 to n2; n1 to n3, etc.

but of course, the energy that is required to go from, say, n3 to n4 is the same as the energy required to go from n4 to n3

Also, photons are only emitted when an electron goes from a higher energy orbital to a lower energy orbital. In other words, only worry about going from some nx to ny where y < x

you should have a formula for determining the energy of an electron at some orbital, and an equation for the energy of some photon with a given wavelength. If you take the difference between two orbitals, then that will tell you how much energy was released/absorbed when the electron went between them.

Going from n3 to n2 will have some energy difference, use that energy difference to find the wavelength
 
  • #3
Thank you for the quick reply :)

Just to make sure I understand what you said.
it doesn't matter if it goes straight from n3 to n1 OR goes from n3 to n2 to n1, either way there will only be a single photon emitted?
I was thinking the electron could emit 2 photons during the longer transition.
 
  • #4
well, it can go from n3 to n2 to n1, and that will emit two photons. But generally, we just consider one transition at a time. Each transition produces a photon.

Going from n3 to n1 will produce a photon with the equivalent energy of the two photons produced when it goes from n3 to n2 to n1.
 
  • #5
Again, thank you. You're a rock star :)
 

1. What is the Bohr's model of electron transition paths?

The Bohr's model of electron transition paths is a scientific theory proposed by Danish physicist Niels Bohr in 1913 to explain the behavior of electrons in an atom. It states that electrons orbit the nucleus in specific paths or energy levels, and can transition between these levels by absorbing or emitting energy.

2. What are the different types of electron transitions according to the Bohr's model?

The Bohr's model identifies three types of electron transitions: absorption, emission, and non-radiative transitions. Absorption occurs when an electron absorbs energy and moves to a higher energy level. Emission occurs when an electron releases energy and moves to a lower energy level. Non-radiative transitions involve the transfer of energy between electrons without the emission or absorption of photons.

3. How does the Bohr's model explain the spectral lines of elements?

The Bohr's model explains the spectral lines of elements as a result of electrons transitioning between different energy levels. When an electron moves from a higher energy level to a lower one, it releases energy in the form of photons. The wavelength of these photons corresponds to the spectral lines observed in the element's emission spectrum.

4. What are the limitations of the Bohr's model of electron transition paths?

One of the main limitations of the Bohr's model is that it only applies to hydrogen-like atoms with one electron. It also does not fully explain the behavior of electrons in multi-electron atoms. Additionally, it does not take into account the wave-like nature of electrons and their uncertainty in position and velocity.

5. How has the Bohr's model influenced our understanding of atomic structure?

The Bohr's model was a significant contribution to the development of atomic theory, as it provided a better understanding of the structure of atoms and their behavior. It also paved the way for further research and discoveries in quantum mechanics, leading to the modern understanding of atomic structure and the behavior of electrons.

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