1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Quantum Book on Quantum Field Theory for PhD

  1. Dec 12, 2016 #1
    Hi all.
    I am looking for a book in Quantum Field Theory, not for the first read. I have already studied it for university purpose, but now i would like to study the subject again from a book to cover holes and have a deeper understanding before starting a possible PhD.
    I heard about Srednicki and Schwartz books and i was thinking about one of them. What do you think is the more appropriate?
    Feel also free to suggest other books if you think there are better options.

    Thanks in advance,
    Luca
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 12, 2016 #2

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  4. Dec 12, 2016 #3

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    If you do want to get the truth behind this powerful theory without getting all the mathematical gore, then the 3 volumes of S. Weinberg's book should be more than helpful.
     
  5. Dec 13, 2016 #4
    Ticciati's 'Quantum Field Theory for Mathematicians' is quite good: https://goo.gl/NzA3Md . Despite its title, it's an excellent option for someone working towards a PhD in physics.
     
  6. Dec 14, 2016 #5

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    Yes, Weinberg's books are the right thing at this stage. He tells without much ado "why QFT is the way it is", and he doesn't only promise it in the preface but really does it!
     
  7. Dec 15, 2016 #6
    So you say Srednicki and Schwartz are not ideal?
     
  8. Dec 15, 2016 #7
    A combination like Klauber and Weinberg might be useful.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2016 #8

    nrqed

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    It is a bit confusing to me because you say that you do not want a "first read" but Srednicki is an introductory text on QFT, so it is hard to tell what the level you want, precisely. Are you at ease with basic canonical quantization? With basic path integrals? Are you at ease with tree level processes? What about one loop calculations?
     
  10. Dec 15, 2016 #9

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    I don't like Srednicki too much, because the ##\phi^3## theory doesn't make sense. Schwartz is excellent. I recommend it as a first read before Weinberg.
     
  11. Dec 15, 2016 #10
    Yes, i already studied all of them. I would like something that can reinforce the notions i already know and fill the gaps (for example i don't know much about anomalies, i would like to study better renormalization and other stuff). I would also like to see applications and example.
    So you think the first 2 Weinberg fit my needs the best?
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  12. Dec 15, 2016 #11

    nrqed

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Weinberg's books are good, yes, although not personal favorites. I would suggest Quantum Field Theory: A Modern Perspective by Nair. Not very well-known but excellent in my opinion.
     
  13. Dec 16, 2016 #12

    atyy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Srednicki has a very good chapter on effective field theory and the renormalization group. Nair and Schwartz too - I have never quite understood Weinberg's exposition on it, although he was one of the proponents of it after Wilson.
     
  14. Dec 16, 2016 #13

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    Yes, I must admit that the chapter on RG is a bit weak in Weinberg, which is surprising since he wrote very important seminal papers on it.

    On the other hand he gives the first-principle derivations in a very clear way. Why I don't think that it's a good introductory book but rather for deepening the understanding for someone who has already some grip of QFT is that he treats almost always the very general case, which is of course more complicated than to treat the special cases usually needed for the understanding of the Standard Model. E.g., he gives a full treatment of the Poincare-group representations for particles of arbitrary spin (of course also a set of famous papers by Weinberg) including spin-statistics and CPT theorem. For the beginner it's sufficient to know the basics, i.e., the special case of scalar, Dirac-fermion, and spin-1 fields (the latter including the massless case). However, to really understand why QFT is the way it is the in-depth treatment of the irreps. of the Poincare group is very illuminating.

    I don't know the book by Nair. What's its advantages compared to, e.g., Schwartz?

    BTW: Another book that was very helpful for me to learn QFT when I was a diploma student is Bailin, Love, Gauge Theories. It's a path-integral-only approach with a very witty derivation of the LSZ-reduction formalism via a generating functional and without operators, i.e., using only path integrals.
     
  15. Dec 16, 2016 #14

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I like the comment by vanhees on Bailin & Love for its amazing value in teaching QFT completely operator free. My course in uni was based on this book.
     
  16. Dec 16, 2016 #15

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    One good thing about Hatfield's book is that he treats QFT in Schrodinger representation. I don't know any other author who does that. But I also like the approach of Bailin and Love and like to read that book one day!
     
  17. Dec 16, 2016 #16

    nrqed

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I also like very much Hatfield's book. A lot of books on QFT feel like they pretty much repeat the same things in the same way. Hatfield truly makes an effort to present things in his own way and his approach is interesting and, I found, very useful.
     
  18. Dec 17, 2016 #17

    MathematicalPhysicist

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Take them all... :-D

    Repetition is not a bad thing, in the end it sinks in.
     
  19. Dec 17, 2016 #18

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    From my own experience I can say that this "sinking in" takes a long time when it comes to QFT, but it's fun to struggle with it.:smile:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Book on Quantum Field Theory for PhD
Loading...