Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid

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In summary, the conversation discusses the use of Perfluorocarbon, a liquid that can be used to fill the lungs and aid in respiration. This technology has been researched since the 1960s and has been successfully used in mice, cats, and even humans. However, there are still challenges with using it in people with weakened respiratory systems. The liquid is mainly made up of carbon, fluoride, and oxygen.
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I watched the movie "The Abyss" last night and was very intriged by the scene where harris puts on the experimental underwater breathing unit. I did some research and it seems it's actually possible to take in a liquid called Perfluorocarbon. Research was done in the 60's and scientists actually got mice and cats to live for weeks while their lungs were full of this liquid. Does anyone know about the current development of this technology?
 
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They'll still working on something similar. The idea is that it can help treat people with lung damage from smoke inhalation, or what have you. The problem is that people with weakened respiration systems have trouble breathing the muck. Still under condsideration the last I heard.
 
  • #3
It's been a long time since I read this so I have no idea where to look to find it again, but I know of at least one case where it was used in humans. Some girl nearly drowned and a lot of sand and silt got into her lungs so even after getting her to the hospital and on a respirator her lungs started to collapse. The positive pressure from the machine would have caused too much damage to her already failing lungs over the next several days so they tried filling them with a perfluorocarbon liquid and using a pump to circulate it. It actually kept her lungs from completely collapsing while causing little damage and the circulation carried out most of the debris.
 
  • #4
Hmm, now that i think of it, I remember that scene in the abyss. Also, one in "Mission to Mars", ...

What makes up Perfluorocarbon, Element-wise? Carbon, Fluoride (?), perhaps oxygen??
 

1. What is Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid?

Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid (PFC) is a liquid that can be used as a substitute for oxygen in breathing. It is made up of fluorine and carbon atoms, and has a high oxygen carrying capacity.

2. How is Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid administered?

PFC can be administered through a special breathing mask or through a tube inserted into the airways. It can also be circulated through the body via a large vein or artery, using a machine called an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) machine.

3. What are the benefits of using Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid?

PFC can improve oxygen delivery to the body's tissues, making it useful in conditions where oxygen delivery is impaired, such as in respiratory failure or high-altitude sickness. It can also help protect against tissue damage and promote healing.

4. What are the risks associated with using Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid?

As with any medical procedure, there are potential risks associated with using PFC. These include blood vessel damage, lung damage, and allergic reactions. Additionally, PFC is not yet approved for use in humans and is still being studied for potential long-term effects.

5. What is the current research on Breathing Perfluorocarbon Liquid?

Scientists are currently researching the potential uses of PFC in various medical conditions, including respiratory failure, high-altitude sickness, and lung injuries. They are also studying the safety and effectiveness of PFC in humans, as well as potential long-term effects. Additionally, PFC is being explored as a potential treatment for other conditions, such as cancer and stroke.

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