Calculate Electric Potential Change: +1 & -3 Micro-Coulombs

In summary, the problem involves finding the change in voltage when a second charge is moved from 2 meters to 4 meters away from a +1 micro-coulomb charge at the origin and a -3 micro-coulomb charge along the x-axis. The equation used is delta V= - integral of E(x)dx, with limits of integration from 2 to 4. However, the negative charge is not included in this equation. The solution can be simplified using the equation electric potential = somestuff / r, which only requires knowing that potential is inversely proportional to r.
  • #1
skt1BOXER
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Homework Statement



There is a +1 micro-coulomb charge at the origin and a -3 micro-coulomb charge at 2 meters away along the x-axis. I am suppose to find the change in Voltage if second charge is moved to 4 meters away from the origin.

Homework Equations



I am thinking of using delta V= - integral of E(x)dx , where the limits of integration is from 2 to 4.

The Attempt at a Solution



i am not sure why the negative three micro-coulomb isn't included when using this equation. can someone explain why?
 
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  • #2
Well I'll tell you're over complicating it. Pretty much the only equation you need is electric potential = somestuff / r

You don't even need to know what the somestuff is, only that potential is inversely proportional to r
 
  • #3


I can confirm that your approach to using the equation delta V= - integral of E(x)dx is correct. This equation takes into account the electric field generated by both charges at the given points. The -3 micro-coulomb charge is not explicitly included because it is already accounted for in the electric field at the point 2 meters away. The electric field at a given point is the sum of the electric fields generated by all charges in the vicinity. Therefore, when calculating the change in voltage due to moving the -3 micro-coulomb charge from 2 to 4 meters away, the change in electric field at the point 2 meters away is already taken into account. I hope this explanation helps clarify your understanding.
 

Related to Calculate Electric Potential Change: +1 & -3 Micro-Coulombs

What is electric potential change?

Electric potential change refers to the difference in electric potential energy between two points in an electric field. It is measured in volts (V) and is a measure of the work done per unit charge to move a charge from one point to another.

How do you calculate electric potential change?

The electric potential change is calculated by dividing the change in electric potential energy by the amount of charge that has been moved. This can be expressed in the formula: ΔV = ΔPE/q, where ΔV is the electric potential change, ΔPE is the change in electric potential energy, and q is the amount of charge moved.

What is the unit for electric potential change?

The unit for electric potential change is volts (V). This is equivalent to joules per coulomb (J/C), as electric potential change is the work done per unit charge.

What is the significance of +1 and -3 micro-coulombs in the calculation?

+1 and -3 micro-coulombs refer to the amount of charge that has been moved from one point to another. This information is needed in the calculation of electric potential change, as it determines the amount of work that has been done to move the charge.

Can electric potential change be negative?

Yes, electric potential change can be negative. This indicates that the electric potential energy has decreased as the charge moved from one point to another. This could happen if the charge is moving towards a region of lower electric potential or if work is being done by external forces on the charge.

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