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I Calculate force needed to move an object during a turn

  1. Nov 16, 2016 #1
    Hey all
    Im trying to figure out the equation(s) to calculate the likely hood of an object that is traveling, moving when the travel path turns. I can figure out the f=mxa easily enough, but i need to take friction into account and the force experienced during the turn. Essentially I need to know the likely hood of 5 pallets stacked on top of each other shifting during a turn. Each pallet weighs 40 lbs. they are stacked on top of each other (friction), and they are traveling at no more than 6 mph. There is on average 100 lbs on the top of the stacked pallets. I cannot figure out which calculations I need to determine the likely hood or the force needed to shift the pallets in any way. Can anyone help? Thanks, djt
     
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  3. Nov 16, 2016 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF. :smile:

    What is the 100 pound object? There is an experiment that would help a lot in this, as long as it is safe to do. Can you take that stack of 5 pallets plus the 100 pound whatever on top, and slowly tip the bottom pallet to the side? You want to record the angle of the pallets versus the horizontal just at the point where something starts to slip (pallet-to-pallet, or 100 pound load on top off the top pallet). That will give you an idea of what your coefficient of friction is, which you would combine with the equations for centripetal acceleration to give you the answer you are looking for.
     
  4. Nov 16, 2016 #3

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    BTW, whatever number you come up with via the calculations, you are going to want to multiply by a pretty good safety factor like x2 or x3...
     
  5. Dec 5, 2016 #4
    The 100 lbs is basically boxes. Cases of freight. The freight is on average 100 lbs but varies in size and weight individually. I will attempt the experiment, as that does seem like a very good way to calculate the friction. Thanks for the reply
     
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