Calculating Acceleration and Friction in Rolling Motion Without Slipping

In summary, the problem is about a hollow, spherical shell with a mass of 2kg rolling down an incline of 38 degrees without slipping. The goal is to find the acceleration, friction force, and minimum coefficient of friction needed to prevent slipping. The equation Vcm=Rw can be used, but since the problem does not provide a radius, the moment of inertia must be used instead. The friction force supplies rotational energy and is linked to the linear and rotational velocities. Assuming the radius is R, it will appear in multiple equations, but should cancel out in the end.
  • #1
Pawprint29
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I can't figure out this problem. Pretty much totally lost. It has a hollow, spherical shell with a mass of 2kg, rolls without slipping down an incline of 38 degree's. It wants me to find the acceleration, the friction force, ane the minimum coeffcient of friction needed to prevent slipping.


The examples in my book and the equations all seem to have the Radius in them, and my problem doesn't give a radius. The equation that is has is Vcm=Rw.
So I'm not sure what to do when I don't have the radius and only the mass.
Since is says it is a hollow sphere, am I supposed to do something with the motion of inertia ? With K=1/2Mv^2+1/2Iw^2 ?

And then I don't know how I'm supposed to find the frictional force and the coeffcient of friction. g(sinθ-μcosθ)=a ?
 
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  • #2
It helps if you use the homework posting template that is provided. Please use it next time.

Yes, you need to use the moment of intertia. The friction force supplies the rotational energy for the cylinder. The cylinder will acquire both translational and rotational energy, as the equation you've written indicates.
 
  • #3
Just assume the radius is R to get started. You are right, the linear and rotation velocities are linked by V(center of mass) = R.omega.

R will appear in other places as well (e.g. the moment of inertia). With luck, all the R's will cancel out in the end.
 

1. What does it mean to roll without slipping?

Rolling without slipping is a type of motion where an object, such as a wheel or a ball, moves forward while simultaneously rotating about its own axis without any slipping or sliding. This occurs when the linear velocity of the object's center of mass is equal to the tangential velocity at the point of contact with the surface it is rolling on.

2. Why is it important to roll without slipping?

Rolling without slipping is important in many practical applications, such as in the design of vehicles and machinery. It allows for efficient and smooth movement without unnecessary friction, which can waste energy and cause wear and tear on the object and the surface it is rolling on.

3. How can I determine if an object is rolling without slipping?

To determine if an object is rolling without slipping, you can use the condition of no slipping, which states that the velocity of the center of mass must be equal to the angular velocity multiplied by the radius of the object. If these two velocities are equal, then the object is rolling without slipping.

4. What factors affect an object's ability to roll without slipping?

The main factors that affect an object's ability to roll without slipping are its mass, shape, and the surface it is rolling on. Objects with a larger mass or an irregular shape may have more difficulty rolling without slipping. Additionally, rougher surfaces can create more friction and make it harder for an object to roll without slipping.

5. Can an object roll without slipping on any surface?

No, an object cannot roll without slipping on any surface. The surface must be smooth enough to allow for rolling without too much friction. If the surface is too rough, the object may slip or get stuck, and if the surface is too slippery, the object may slide instead of rolling.

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