Calculating Time to reach 60 mph

  • Thread starter sadhik
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In summary, To calculate the time it takes for a car to reach 60 mph, you will need to convert all units to metric and use the formula P=E/t, where P is power, E is energy, and t is time. However, this calculation will not be entirely accurate as it does not take into account factors such as friction, gearing, and aerodynamics. Alternatively, you could use the formula v=u+at, where u is initial velocity, a is acceleration, and t is time, but you will need to know the mass and initial velocity of the car.
  • #1
sadhik
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In the given table how to calculate the time 0-60 mph(seconds):cry:
 

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  • #2
ummm, there is certainly not enough information there to calculate a 0-60 time.

unless you're assuming that all power is used 100% efficiently for forward motion and neglect things like friction, gearing, aerodynamics etc etc etc
 
  • #3
you could probably roughly use P=E/t and E=1/2*mv², but you're going to have to get some common units.
 
  • #4
60 miles = 316800 ft
So initial velocity(u) = 88 ft/sec

Weight = 3320 lb
?Mass(m) = 3320/32 =103.75 lb

?Any chance to get Acceleration(a) from Power:Weight = 0.13554217 hp/lb

?Velocity(v)
 
  • #5
well, actually your initial velocity (u) is zero and your final velocity is 60mph

I think they actually mean mass when they say weight in lbs, especially if they're talking about a car, 3320lb mass seems reasonable.

I'm not sure how the US units work so well, so here are the metric standards:
Power - Watts (W)
Energy - Joules (J)
Velocity - metres per second (m/s)
Mass - kilograms (kg)
Force - Newtons (N)
time - seconds (s)
Acceleration - metres per second squared (m/s²)

Try find the equivalent standard units for your unit system or convert everything to metric and try it like I wrote previously.
 
  • #6
?Final Velocity(v)=60 mph=3801600 inches/h=96560.8331 m/h=26.8224537 m/s

?Mass(m)=3320 lb=1505.92656 Kg

?Energy=1/2 mv^2=541714.97 Joules

?Power=450 HP=335700 Watts=541714.97 Joules / t
 
Last edited:

1. How is time to reach 60 mph calculated?

The time to reach 60 mph is calculated by dividing the distance it takes to reach 60 mph by the acceleration, which is measured in miles per hour per second (mph/s). This calculation uses the formula t = (v - u) / a, where t is the time, v is the final velocity (60 mph), u is the initial velocity (usually 0 mph), and a is the acceleration.

2. What is the average time it takes to reach 60 mph?

The average time to reach 60 mph can vary depending on the vehicle's acceleration and the road conditions. However, on average, it takes about 7-8 seconds for a regular car to reach 60 mph.

3. Can the time to reach 60 mph be affected by external factors?

Yes, external factors such as the weight of the vehicle, road conditions, and wind resistance can affect the time it takes to reach 60 mph. Heavier vehicles or rough road surfaces can result in a longer time, while aerodynamic designs and smooth roads can decrease the time.

4. How do I convert the time to reach 60 mph to other units?

The time to reach 60 mph can be converted to other units such as seconds, minutes, or hours by using conversion factors. For example, 60 mph is equal to 26.8224 meters per second or 96.5606 kilometers per hour. To convert to seconds, simply multiply the time in hours by 3,600 (60 minutes x 60 seconds). To convert to minutes, multiply the time in hours by 60.

5. Is the time to reach 60 mph the same as the time to brake from 60 mph?

No, the time to reach 60 mph is not the same as the time to brake from 60 mph. The time to brake depends on the braking system and the condition of the brakes, while the time to reach 60 mph is determined by the acceleration of the vehicle. Additionally, the distance needed to come to a complete stop is longer than the distance needed to reach 60 mph due to factors such as reaction time and braking distance.

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