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Calculus-Based Physics A Free Physics Textbook by Jeffrey W. Schnick

  1. Jul 16, 2009 #1
    Hello everyone. I registered here because I am having difficulty with my physics book. My class required us to purchase Tiplers Physics for scientists and engineers. However I find the book very confusing and difficult to follow. While I am sure it is a good book it just isn't the one for me.

    I came across Jeffrey Schnicks free ebook and was wondering if anyone has used the book and what they thought of it. Also are there any physics books you would recommend for someone who has just started a college calculus based physics class. Thank you for your time.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2009 #2
    Yeah, I'm also looking for a good calculus-based physics book. I'm starting Physics I next semester and the professor, though he doesn't state its necessary to HAVE the book, will be using Giancoli's Physics 6th edition. I searched here around the forum and many others state Halliday and Resnick's book. There's a free eTextbook by Christoph Schiller, Motion Mountain, which unforunately, doesn't look calculus-based but so far seems like a good read.
     
  4. Aug 11, 2009 #3

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Ben Crowell has authored several books, which he makes available for free: http://www.lightandmatter.com/. His book "Simple Nature" is calculus based.

    Edit: I posted the above in case someone's looking for a free textbook. If that's not an issue, then there are many good intro textbooks available.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2009
  5. Aug 11, 2009 #4
    Most of the books with Serway as an author I like. The older versions are very nice imo but the symbols have changed a bit. Symbols and units can be a real problem for some folks skipping from text to text. We dont have enough letters in our alphabet and the Greek symbols are pretty much used up. The number of different hand rules presented for various fields ideas is also quite extensive and confusing.

    Condensing what I have seen in Mechanics, students on the whole have the most problems in the following areas:
    1. Rotation
    2. Oscillation

    In electricty and magnetism I guess you can name it. Static electricity is not so bad until Guauss' Law. Circuits are not so bad until RC, RL, RLC circuits. Maxwells stuff built on Faraday and others takes patience. Field theory is not terribly intuitive imo. So far all you people having trouble in this section, it takes time and I feel your pain as I was not trained in Physics. This is coming from a molecular biology, biochemistry guy who is always learning Physics. Some people who understand Physics extraordinarily well are sometimes the worst at explaining it because they may have a great deal of difficulty understanding what you do not understand. Hang tough. The more people you talk to and listen to (along with practice, practice, practice) the more beautiful Physics becomes. On the Classical level it is so much "cleaner" than Biology and Chemistry.
     
  6. Aug 11, 2009 #5
    Oh yes.

    And since I have found this site I like reading the questions and discussion that I think I have a feel for and then gather new ways of looking at what I thought I understood. And of course spending more time on things I am a bit shaky on. I like this site. There are varying degrees of difficulty with people that seem very nice about explaining things.
     
  7. Oct 16, 2009 #6
    Be careful. You seem to be endeavoring in a calculus-based physics class, and Giancoli Physics 6th Edition is quite certainly only algebra-based (I know this, because I am currently in an algebra-based physics class, using this book). I am not very well knowledged in this particular subject, but I know that this is not what you are looking for, albeit it is a good book.
     
  8. Oct 19, 2009 #7
    I started reading the electricity and magnetism book a year or two ago (can't remember) and I didn't like it, it was too simple compared to even a general physics book, and didn't cover enough topics. Just my two cents.
     
  9. Oct 20, 2009 #8

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Make sure you're looking at the book I mentioned, "Simple Nature", which is the one for engineers. His stand alone E&M book is meant for non-engineers.
     
  10. Oct 20, 2009 #9
    Is there any free book(s) available that has sets of exercises after each chapter? I'm looking for more practice material but most of the free content available online (the books I've found / the classes on iTunes U) only have theory, no practice problems.

    I'm glad to have access to all this free content but would really like to be able to practice it!
     
  11. Jan 5, 2010 #10
    i have tipler's too and i hate it. thanks for everyone's opinions!!
     
  12. Mar 17, 2010 #11
    I found Resnick to be a wonderful text.
     
  13. Jul 22, 2010 #12
    Well, Maxwells stuff built on Faraday and others takes patience.
     
  14. Aug 5, 2010 #13
    Thank you for providing such a good site
     
  15. Aug 16, 2010 #14
    Hei, help me too. I'm an engineering student having problem wit my strength of material.
     
  16. Sep 22, 2010 #15
    I would recommend checking out "Mechanics of Materials" by R.C. Hibbeler...i picked up one of the old second edition ones on amazon for really cheap. It was used of course, but in good condition and the material is all relevant. This book does assume basic calculus, but thats almost necessary for solid mechanics. It explains derivations much better than the required book when I took the class.
     
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