Can a stationary, massive particle have a de Broglie wavelength?

In summary, the conversation discusses whether a stationary, massive particle can have a de Broglie wavelength. The individuals involved suggest that it is not possible for a sub-atomic particle above absolute zero to be stationary, and that for a macroscopic body, there is always a reference frame in which it is moving. However, they also mention that a massive particle does have a de Broglie wavelength, which is inversely proportional to its mass.
  • #1
swain1
30
0
Quick question
Can a stationary, massive particle have a de Broglie wavelength? I thougt not but there is a question that doesn't state a speed. I think it might be incorrect.

Cheers
 
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  • #2
There's no such thing as a stationary sub-atomic particle above absolute zero. For a macroscopic body you can always find a reference frame in which it is moving. But that does not answer your question ...
 
Last edited:
  • #3
Hey Swain ... Yes Massive Particle have de Broglie wavelength...But it is very less to compare because According to de broglie Equation lambda=h/mv
wave length of the wave is invresely proportional to the mass... so when the masss of the particle increases its wavelength decreases comparitively
 

1. What is a de Broglie wavelength?

The de Broglie wavelength is a concept in quantum mechanics that describes the wavelength of a particle. It is named after physicist Louis de Broglie and is given by the equation λ = h/mv, where h is Planck's constant, m is the mass of the particle, and v is the velocity of the particle.

2. Can a stationary, massive particle have a de Broglie wavelength?

Yes, according to quantum mechanics, all particles have a de Broglie wavelength, regardless of their velocity. This includes stationary particles, such as particles at rest.

3. How is the de Broglie wavelength related to the uncertainty principle?

The de Broglie wavelength is related to the uncertainty principle, which states that the more precisely we know a particle's position, the less precisely we can know its momentum, and vice versa. The de Broglie wavelength is a measure of the momentum of a particle, and therefore, knowing its wavelength gives us information about its momentum and vice versa.

4. Can the de Broglie wavelength be measured?

Yes, the de Broglie wavelength can be measured using various techniques, such as diffraction or interference experiments. These experiments involve observing the behavior of a particle as it interacts with a barrier or passes through a narrow slit, and the resulting pattern can be used to calculate the de Broglie wavelength of the particle.

5. Does the de Broglie wavelength have any practical applications?

Yes, the de Broglie wavelength has several practical applications in modern technology, such as electron microscopy and electron diffraction techniques used in materials science. It also plays a crucial role in understanding the behavior of particles in quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules.

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