Can light be synthetically created ?

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In summary, if you use two sources of electric and magnetic fields, you can create an antenna that oscillates with the frequency of visible light. However, I do not know of a way to do this without involving Maxwell's equations and the resulting noise and reactance problems.
  • #1
If I use two sources , one for alternating electric field ( frequency equal to the frequency of a wave in visible spectrum ) , one for alternating magnetic field (frequency equal to the frequency of a wave in visible spectrum ) and make them intersect each other at 90 degrees in mid air will i be able to see light in mid air ?
 
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  • #2
shiveeshfoteda said:
If I use two sources , one for alternating electric field ( frequency equal to the frequency of a wave in visible spectrum ) , one for alternating magnetic field (frequency equal to the frequency of a wave in visible spectrum )
How would you make such fields?
 
  • #3
You don't have to have the alternating electric field. In your antenna, the alternating electric field necessarily creates an alternating magnetic field.

Creating an antenna for lower frequency waves is not a problem, but as far as I know, no one has created any circuitry that oscillate with visible light frequency due to hysteresis, noise, and reactance problems.
 
  • #4
i was thinking it to be a thought experiment , for example I'm rotating a magnet and an electric dipole (both kept at large distance ) , the axis of rotation of the magnet and the electric dipole is perpendicular to each other , and they are rotating with same angular frequency as the frequency of visible spectrum . So if i take a point in between these sources i'll be having an alternating electric field and an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to each other with frequency equivalent to the frequency of light .
 
  • #5
shiveeshfoteda said:
for example I'm rotating a magnet
Rotating a magnet will produce an e-field as well as the b-field. That is how a generator works.

I don't know a way to produce the kinds of fields that you are talking about in the OP. I suspect that they are not compatible with Maxwell's equations, but I don't know for sure.
 

1. Can light be created from scratch in a laboratory?

Yes, light can be created from scratch in a laboratory through a process called synthesis. This involves using energy sources such as electricity or lasers to excite atoms and produce photons, which are the fundamental particles of light.

2. How is synthetic light different from natural light?

Synthetic light is man-made, while natural light comes from sources such as the sun or fire. Synthetic light can also be controlled and manipulated in terms of its intensity, color, and direction, whereas natural light is dependent on external factors and cannot be controlled in the same way.

3. What are the potential applications of synthetic light?

Synthetic light has a wide range of applications, including in the fields of medicine, technology, and entertainment. It can be used in medical procedures such as phototherapy, in fiber optics for communication and data transfer, and in special effects for movies and concerts.

4. Can synthetic light be harmful to humans or the environment?

Like any other source of light, synthetic light can be harmful if not used properly. For example, excessive exposure to certain types of synthetic light, such as UV radiation, can damage human skin and eyes. Synthetic light can also contribute to light pollution, affecting the natural behaviors of animals and plants.

5. Is synthetic light a sustainable alternative to natural light?

Synthetic light can be a sustainable alternative to natural light in certain situations, such as in areas where natural light is limited or during nighttime. However, the production and use of synthetic light also require energy and resources, so it is important to use it responsibly and consider energy-efficient options.

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