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Can radiation particles contribute to heat transfer in space?

  1. Jan 18, 2016 #1
    Freon is used every day to reduce temperature by compressing the gas then releasing the pressure. The Question is dose radiation from the sun (witch would be high pressure) steal energy from the objects it comes in contact with in space (witch is low pressure), Thus contribute to the loss of heat in space? dose radiation act the same as other mater in pressure to non pressure states?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 18, 2016 #2

    davenn

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    no, EM radiation will in general impart energy to whatever it comes in contact with and will heat it up ....
    the earth, its atmosphere, satellites in orbit, comets and anything else out there

    BTW it is does not dose
    does = does this or that happen
    dose = I will give you your dose of medicine to make you well

    witch = casts spells and does incantations
    which = used referring to something previously mentioned


    Dave
     
  4. Jan 18, 2016 #3
    sorry spelling is not a strong subject for me or grammar. Thank you for the answer.
     
  5. Jan 18, 2016 #4

    davenn

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    no probs :smile:
    hope the answer to your Q was useful
     
  6. Jan 18, 2016 #5
    "Freon is used every day to reduce temperature by compressing the gas then releasing the pressure."

    I think your understanding of refrigeration cycles needs improving because it has lead you astray when it comes to other areas. Pressure is not the driver for heat transfer, temperature is. Here is a brief outline of an ideal gas refrigeration cycle.
    1. A gas is compressed, so it goes to a higher P and a higher T than ambient (high T is needed for step 2).
    2. The gas is then allowed to cool, at a constant P, by heat transfer to the ambient. This lowers the T of the gas.
    3. Then the gas is throttled, which lowers the P and brings the T to below that of the refrigerated space (low T is required for step 4).
    4. Finally, the gas is heated at constant P by heat transfer from the refrigerated space. This increases the T of the gas on its way back to step 1.
    This cycle repeats over and over with the gas. Throughout the cycle, pressure is manipulated as a proxy to control temperature, which is the property that determines the heat transfers. Pressure, of itself, is not actually aiding in the heat transfers that need to take place - that is determined entirely by temperature.

    I hope this helps. :-)
     
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